tenurable

tenurable

(ˈtɛnjʊrəbəl)
adj
1. (Education) related to an academic post carrying tenure
2. (Education) in a position to be granted tenure
References in periodicals archive ?
Let's even demand the conversion of long-term precarious contract positions into stable tenurable teaching positions.
The demographics of the professional respondents are consistent with what others (Healy, 1995; Ervin, 2002; Geller & Denny, 2013) have reported as the general makeup of the writing center profession: primarily tenured or tenurable writing center directors as well as directors with administrative staff positions, mostly from departments of English, writing, composition/rhetoric, and other humanities.
Students of academic life express this decline quantitatively, citing shrinking enrollments in history courses, the disappearance of required history courses in university curricula, and the loss of tenurable faculty positions in all history-related areas.
Feminists moved between universities, often contract teaching at several universities before landing tenurable positions, and we would meet up at the same functions and public lectures.
In many departments, NTT faculty operate largely outside the collective reckoning of the tenured and tenurable, their abstracted presence recognized only during times of personnel reviews and budget cuts.
Just short of that, it devoted its tenurable, monomaniacal labors to the repetition of two bulletable and unprecedented points: first, to demonstrating that society could definitively shift in a single flicker from civilization to barbarism, as if the difference between the two were nothing more than the angle at which the same artifact were tilted under the light, one way and then the other; and second, to demonstrating that those who stood closest to this drastic flickering, who even pulled the levers, turned the dials, and watched it happen right there in the streets, would afterward insist, "We never saw a thing.
People who write about higher education agree that such teachers continue to be overworked, underpaid, and often egregiously deceived into staying on by the vain hope that someday they can become regular, tenurable faculty members.
However, "there is nonetheless an emergent and vigorous culture of faculty opposition--just not in the tenurable majority" (2008b, 13).
An Australian study by Allen and Castleman (2001:161) challenges this argument in finding that even for faculty under age 30 and accounting for length of service, men were more likely to hold senior positions, already have tenure, and hold a tenurable position.
Might anger be blocked in the present moment not only because it isn't nice, or tenurable, but also because it feels dishonest to continue protesting when "we" are better off than we were, while others are less well off than "we" are now?
The myriad ways in which this particular thought-form has for generations shown itself to be unusually unstable, not a phenomenon that did not happen or that was absent (although this too has been suggested at various points in literary-institutional history, including the present-day, which sees the waning of romanticism as a curricular subject and field of tenurable expertise), but rather present in a manner that is shot through with absences, remainders, elisions, hidden histories and missed opportunities: a possibility, yes, but always happening in the mode of its uncontainable impossibilities.
All four groups are tenurable faculty and thus fall under the post-tenure review policy and procedures.