tephra


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teph·ra

 (tĕf′rə)
n.
Solid matter that is ejected into the air by an erupting volcano.

[Greek tephrā, ash; see dhegwh- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tephra

(ˈtɛfrə)
n
(Geological Science) chiefly US solid matter ejected during a volcanic eruption
[C20: Greek, literally: ashes]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

teph·ra

(tĕf′rə)
Solid matter, such as ash, dust, and cinders, that is ejected into the air by an erupting volcano.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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Seedling establishment in forests affected by tephra from Mount St.
For animals, however, Oakland cited the "most dramatic" example, a Nebraska site where rhinos, hippos, and zebras were buried in "swimming positions" by "volcanic ash." What tephra has to do with global flooding he did not say.
One of the largest and most violent incidents in human history was the eruption of Krakatau in 1883; scientists estimate that this eruption produced as much as 50 billion tons of tephra. Although it is not known how much of the erupted ash reached the stratosphere, a cloud encircled the earth in a few weeks and there was a full year of unusually red sunsets before it disappeared.
A phreatic eruption is one that is mostly just steam and ash, while pyroclastic flows contain hot gas as well as fragmented volcanic material called tephra.
However, the brief post-eruption recovery in both interior and coastal settings suggests that more work is needed to understand the extent and the ecological and subsistence-economic ramifications of the Aniakchak II volcanic tephra plume (R.
190) seems to have begun in the area shortly before the deposition of the so-called 'landnam tephra', dated to c.
In studies of vegetational recovery from the volcanic tephra (ash and silt) deposited by this eruption, E.
In satellite imagery, this dormant volcano in southern Libya can be identified by the large black smear of dark basaltic tephra that extends 10-20 kilometres around the caldera.
At 9:09 pm, on November 13,1985, NRV, a small volume of mixed andesite and dacite magma was ejected as pumice fall and pyroclastic density currents during the Plinian eruption that pumped tephra into the atmosphere for more than 30 km (20 mi)--a commercial flight witnessed this eruption.