teratoma


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Related to teratoma: Sacrococcygeal teratoma

ter·a·to·ma

 (tĕr′ə-tō′mə)
n. pl. ter·a·to·mas or ter·a·to·ma·ta (-mə-tə)
A tumor consisting of different types of tissue, as of skin, hair, and muscle, caused by the development of independent germ cells.

ter′a·to′ma·tous (-tō′mə-təs) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

teratoma

(ˌtɛrəˈtəʊmə)
n, pl -mata (-mətə) or -mas
(Pathology) pathol a tumour or group of tumours composed of tissue foreign to the site of growth
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ter•a•to•ma

(ˌtɛr əˈtoʊ mə)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
a tumor made up of different types of tissue.
[1885–90; < Greek terat-, s. of téras monster + -oma]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.teratoma - a tumor consisting of a mixture of tissues not normally found at that site
neoplasm, tumor, tumour - an abnormal new mass of tissue that serves no purpose
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ter·a·to·ma

n. teratoma, neoplasma que deriva de más de una capa embrionaria y que se compone de tejidos de distintos tipos.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

teratoma

n teratoma m
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are no pathognomonic features of a retroperitoneal teratoma on plain radiographs, although they may demonstrate calcification.
In view of the presence of an isolated intranasal mass, the differential diagnoses considered at the time of presentation were congenital midline nasal mass (e.g., nasal glioma) and nasal tumor (e.g., nasal chondromesenchymal hamartoma, or nasal teratoma).
Rupture accounts for 1%-2% of all complications associated with teratoma. Teratoma rupture can be classified as acute or chronic type.
The primitive cardiac teratoma is extremely rare; the cases reported in the literature are limited to a dozen cases and they are approximatively 1-5% of all pediatric neoplasms [4, 5].
All the cases (7 cases) of benign cystic teratoma were correctly diagnosed based on their characteristic ultrasound features which included:
Dalmau identified anti-hippocampal and prefrontal nerve cell membrane NMDAR antibodies in this patient population and first named this syndrome.[1] Here, we describe a case of one patient with anti-NMDAR encephalitis accompanied by ovarian teratoma.
Hartley was diagnosed with a disease called teratoma. The disease sparked encephalitis, an autoimmune condition that causes inflammation in the brain, and triggered Hartley to have seizures and hallucinations of demons.
Se definio como "gestacion multiple de dificil diagnostico" aquella en la que el examen del (de los) feto(s) planteo uno de los diagnosticos diferenciales expuestos (feto macerado/evanescente, gemelo siames, fetus in fetu, feto acardico, teratoma congenito).
Dr Al Agha cited particularly the Sacrococcygeal Teratoma, an unusual tumour that, in the newborn, is located at the base of the tailbone (coccyx).
Ultrasound can detect an intratesticular multicystic mass, and the normal testicular parenchyma can be evaluated when the clinical diagnosis suggests a cystic teratoma (1, 5-6).
In older adults, there is more of a possibility of being diagnosed with teratoma, but FIF cannot be completely ruled out.A But this particular case of the 17-year-old girl was well defined since the lumpA "was composed of hairy cheesy material, multiple teeth and structures resembling limb buds." The fact that makes this case extremely unique is that the girl in question neither had twins nor teratoma in her family's medical history.
Keywords: Mediastinal neoplasms, Teratoma, Mature cystic teratoma, Cervical.