terbium


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ter·bi·um

 (tûr′bē-əm)
n. Symbol Tb
A soft, silvery-gray metallic element of the lanthanide series, extracted chiefly from monazite, used in high-temperature fuel cells as a stabilizer, in alloys responsive to a magnetic field, and in x-ray machines and lasers. Atomic number 65; atomic weight 158.925; melting point 1,356°C; boiling point 3,230°C; specific gravity 8.230; valence 3, 4. See Periodic Table.

[After Ytterby, a town in Sweden.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

terbium

(ˈtɜːbɪəm)
n
(Elements & Compounds) a soft malleable silvery-grey element of the lanthanide series of metals, occurring in gadolinite and monazite and used in lasers and for doping solid-state devices. Symbol: Tb; atomic no: 65; atomic wt: 158.92534; valency: 3 or 4; relative density: 8.230; melting pt: 1356°C; boiling pt: 3230°C
[C19: from New Latin, named after Ytterby, Sweden, village where it was discovered]
ˈterbic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ter•bi•um

(ˈtɜr bi əm)

n.
a rare-earth, metallic element present in certain minerals and yielding colorless salts. Symbol: Tb; at. no.: 65; at. wt.: 158.924; sp. gr.: 8.25.
[1843; (Yt)terb(y), a town in Sweden, source of rare earth–containing minerals + -ium2; compare ytterbium]
ter′bic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ter·bi·um

(tûr′bē-əm)
Symbol Tb A soft, easily shaped, silvery-gray metallic element of the lanthanide series. It is used in color television tubes, x-ray machines, and lasers. Atomic number 65. See Periodic Table.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.terbium - a metallic element of the rare earth groupterbium - a metallic element of the rare earth group; used in lasers; occurs in apatite and monazite and xenotime and ytterbite
metal, metallic element - any of several chemical elements that are usually shiny solids that conduct heat or electricity and can be formed into sheets etc.
apatite - a common complex mineral consisting of calcium fluoride phosphate or calcium chloride phosphate; a source of phosphorus
gadolinite, ytterbite - a mineral that is a source of rare earths; consists of silicates of iron and beryllium and cerium and yttrium and erbium
monazite - a reddish-brown mineral containing rare earth metals; an important source of thorium and cerium
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
тербий
terbium
terbium
terbio
terbium
terbium
terbij
terbium
terbín
テルビウム
terbium
terbis
terbium
terb
terbiu
terbium
terbij
terbium
terbiyum

terbium

[ˈtɜːbɪəm] Nterbio m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Terbium and dysprosium are also critical in defence technologies, ceramics and advanced magnets.
The automaker stated that it has developed a magnet for the motors that as much as halves the use of a rare earth called neodymium and eliminates the use of others called terbium and dysprosium.
Here, we report the quenching produced by neonicotinoids on the luminescence signal of terbium. In analytical chemistry, the detection called terbium-sensitized luminescence (TSL) is based on the increase observed when terbium ions form complexes with fluorescence compounds [25].
The lanthanides are categorised as light REs composed of elements with atomic numbers Z = 57 (lanthanum, La) to 61 (promethium, Pm), the medium RE elements ranging from Z = 62 (samarium, Sm) to Z = 64 (gadolinium, Gd), and lastly, the heavy RE elements include Z = 65 (terbium, Tb) through to Z = 71 (lutetium, Lu) [4].
"Credit unions face greater existential risks from fraud and information security incidents than do larger financial institutions." said Tyler Carbone, chief product officer of Baltimore-based dark web intelligence company Terbium Labs.
They combined three materials: calcium, cobalt and terbium. The resultant material "needs less than one degree difference in temperature to produce a detectable voltage," according to a press release by the U of U.
In radish plants, the use of terbium (Tb3+) (5 mg L-1) increases the activity of ascorbate and decreases guaiacol content (Wang et al., 2009).
A recent discovery comprising a chemical combination of calcium, cobalt and terbium was found to create an efficient, inexpensive and bio-friendly material that could solve energy shortages and price volatility worldwide.
Motalov, "Thermodynamic properties of neutral and charged species in high-temperature vapour over terbium and thulium trichlorides," High Temperatures-High Pressures, vol.
The emission spectrum of the samples (0-40 kGy) does not exhibit strong and sharp peaks, but displays wide and broad peaks due to the absence of trivalent rare earth doping activation ion such as Europium ion ([Eu.sup.3+]), Praseodymium ion ([Pr.sup.3+]), and Terbium ion ([Tb.sup.3+]) [24].
Although the absorption cross section luminescence efficiency of lanthanides can be improved using organic ligands and energy transfer (antenna effect), the chelate molecules luminescence is quenched by PMMA nonradiative transitions and efficient luminescence can be observed only for triplet state europium ([Eu.sup.3+]) and terbium ([Tb.sup.3+]) complexes [19-26].
Chen, "Electrochemical metallization of solid terbium oxide," Angewandte Chemie International Edition, vol.