tercet


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

ter·cet

 (tûr′sĭt)
n.
1. A group of three lines of verse, often rhyming together or with another triplet.
2. Music See triplet.

[French, from Italian terzetto, from diminutive of terzo, third, from Latin tertius; see trei- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

tercet

(ˈtɜːsɪt; tɜːˈsɛt)
n
(Poetry) a group of three lines of verse that rhyme together or are connected by rhyme with adjacent groups of three lines
[C16: from French, from Italian terzetto, diminutive of terzo third, from Latin tertius]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ter•cet

(ˈtɜr sɪt, tɜrˈsɛt)

n.
a group of three lines of verse rhyming together or connected by rhyme with the adjacent group or groups of three lines.
[1590–1600; < French < Italian terzetto < Latin tertius. See -et]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

tercet

A group of three lines, often connected by rhyme.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tercet - the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and onetercet - the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one
digit, figure - one of the elements that collectively form a system of numeration; "0 and 1 are digits"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

tercet

[ˈtɜːsɪt] Nterceto m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

tercet

n (Poet) → Terzine f; (Mus) → Triole f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
Critics have also proposed a literal interpretation of the final tercet, as reflected in the Fosters' judgment that it is "anticlimactic and merits attention only for the complexity of its syntax" (92); a viewpoint which, on a surface level, does have some validity.
Yet upon its republication in Collected Works, the 2002 edition of Niedecker's oeuvre edited by Jenny Penberthy, this utterance is joined to the previous stanza as a tercet, leaving only three stanzas which unfold in a stanzaic progression of monostich, tercet, and couplet.
Like the various trees that the poem asks "One" to learn to behold, the poetic surfaces of "The Snow Man" crack and crumble, becoming an icy, slippery surface that speeds up with an increased frequency of enjambment (indeed, the fourth tercet completely lacks punctuation) toward "the nothing that is." Like winter's wind, unencumbered by leafy resistance, the poem's sentence does away, it would seem, with distinction, variety, and figuration.
The four unrhymed tercet poetic units hold the book together and keep it from breaking into existential fragments.
On a technical level, it is striking how the spiraling ghazal structure, both open and concentrated, also led Bly into the tightest poetic form he has ever written in: tercets in even lines, in which each self-sufficient tercet offers a new configuration or variation on a theme.
The first tercet employs verbs in perfect tenses, and the first two lines repeat the same temporal adverb (cuando) (9-14).
In the first quatrain an opposition is posed between the rhymes made with nominative singular and those made with the genitive plural--the weighty "masterov" rhymes with the similarly formidable "znatokov." The second quatrain and the first tercet are likewise playing on the singular-plural divide: "trudov--zritel'--oblakov--spasitel" and "ochakh--luchakh--Siona," respectively.
The twelfth poem, "De Profundis," begins with this tercet:
A three-lines-a-center was Purcett, So when he penned a limerick (curse it!) The blessed thing came out a tercet! Absentminded, the late poet Moore, Jaywalking, at work on line four, Was killed by a truck.
Originally written at right angles on the reverse of the sheet, the second tercet of 'The Windhover' runs counter to what it nevertheless endorses, concluding, as a signet-ring pressed into sealing-wax, with 'gold-vermilion'.