tercet

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ter·cet

 (tûr′sĭt)
n.
1. A group of three lines of verse, often rhyming together or with another triplet.
2. Music See triplet.

[French, from Italian terzetto, from diminutive of terzo, third, from Latin tertius; see trei- in Indo-European roots.]

tercet

(ˈtɜːsɪt; tɜːˈsɛt)
n
(Poetry) a group of three lines of verse that rhyme together or are connected by rhyme with adjacent groups of three lines
[C16: from French, from Italian terzetto, diminutive of terzo third, from Latin tertius]

ter•cet

(ˈtɜr sɪt, tɜrˈsɛt)

n.
a group of three lines of verse rhyming together or connected by rhyme with the adjacent group or groups of three lines.
[1590–1600; < French < Italian terzetto < Latin tertius. See -et]

tercet

A group of three lines, often connected by rhyme.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tercet - the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and onetercet - the cardinal number that is the sum of one and one and one
digit, figure - one of the elements that collectively form a system of numeration; "0 and 1 are digits"
Translations

tercet

[ˈtɜːsɪt] Nterceto m

tercet

n (Poet) → Terzine f; (Mus) → Triole f
References in periodicals archive ?
Gerald Dawe has remarked that Murphy's love poems, which are most often written in sonnets and tercets, are as fine as Robert Graves's love poems and this is accurate, fitting praise.
Her crisp tercets and repetition of the long o sound send the reader to wander in the dark and puts Elkins's astute ear on display.
In the first of two tercets, Schultz establishes a pattern in which the first line ends on the word leaves, the second line ends on dead, and the third line ends on book.
Elsewhere, she maneuvers ragged tercets, balanced by end and internal rhymes, in, for example, the intentionally banal reportage of "Dog Days.
The sonnets discovered among Luisa's letters to Pratesi are written in hendecasyllables, an alternate rhyme scheme of ABAB in the quatrains, and varying patterns in the tercets, typical of the 13th-century dolce stil novo.
Overwhelming the reader like grief itself, the poem's unpunctuated tercets guide us through Gabriel's life and death, as well as through narratives about others who have lost children.
If baseball were in verse form, it would be cast in tercets.
In another passage from the book-length poem--comprising an unnumbered sequence of seventy-seven sections (one of which begins "From the Book of Regrets") of ten tercets each--Hirsch writes how, before his son's ill-fated departure from his mother's apartment one afternoon in 2011, "I was at home in Brooklyn working // On a simple poem about nothing / A troubadour song / How nothing came to me .
In the sestet, the poet places the social problem of Arcadia into a broader context of class difference and human isolation, developing these themes in two tercets: in the first tercet rhyme evokes an image of classes walking in a separate "groove" as they "move" through life; in the second tercet rhyme emphasizes our consequent incapacity to "understand" (109).
The tercets do not alter the mood; there is no break from the rapture, no desengano or return to reality, but more of the same.
The most ambitious of these, simply titled "Wolfe," encompasses in a series of breathless, clipped tercets the entire narrative sweep of the author's eventful life, from his birth in a "marriage of clamor" to his final "voluptuous relief's closure" (64, 66).
Some years ago, I was inspired to pen a thank-you note to a friend of mine in rhyming tercets.