terminist

terminist

(ˈtɜːmɪnɪst)
n
(Theology) theol someone who accepts the doctrine of terminism
References in periodicals archive ?
Studies on the Aristotelian and Terminist Tradition.
8) By an explicit connection between rhetoric and terminist logic, Valla defines "sects" as ".
In doing this he performs a valuable service to the scholarly community, allowing Aristotle scholars and others to apply seminal ideas from the Philosopher to topics in the history of philosophy, for example, the Terminist tradition, and to contemporary discussions.
A typical case may be the Laws attributed to Augustus Morgan and, thus known with that name, whose origins, however, must be traced back some five centuries, to the time of the much ignored terminist logicians.
45) Galileo was more influenced by Terminist reflections on kinematics and the critical tradition of Italian Aristotelianism along with the newly rediscovered work of Archimedes.
Whereas the via moderna, "transmigrated to the New World of its yearned-for experience, has become transmogrified into a new and expedient nominalism that views experience as terminist .
The facts that Calvin was trained as a Parisian Terminist and also studied Augustine deeply have long been determined, but to assume that this means that Calvin was taught by members of a Schola needs much more demonstration than McGrath provides.
On the one hand, we find statements which favor a terminist interpretation, that is, categories as categories of terms, not things.
52) Lambert Marie de Rijk, Logica Modernorum: A Contribution to the History of Early Terminist Logic, 2 vols.
First, there was the revival of terminist logic, to supersede the modist logic fashionable in Paris at the end of the thirteenth century.
In fairness to Kant, who can hardly have been expected to be familiar with late medieval Spanish scholasticism, most logicians of his period belonged to the so-called terminist school exemplified by the writings of William of Ockham, and even earlier, by the work of Peter of Spain (Pope John XXI).
After a brief introduction relating Pasquier's Pourparler du Prince to the medieval disputatio, Perigot's part 1 tackles the latter's definition, difference from lectio, origins, essential link to dialectic, and use by a number of medieval writers including Anselm, Abelard, Peter Lombard, Albertus Magnus, Saint Thomas (who rates a chapter to himself), and the Terminists.