terminological


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Related to terminological: inexactitude, terminologies

ter·mi·nol·o·gy

 (tûr′mə-nŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. ter·mi·nol·o·gies
1. The vocabulary of technical terms used in a particular field, subject, science, or art; nomenclature.
2. The study of nomenclature.

[German Terminologie, from Medieval Latin terminus, expression; see term.]

ter′mi·no·log′i·cal (-nə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl) adj.
ter′mi·no·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ter′mi·nol′o·gist n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.terminological - of or concerning terminology; "terminological disputes"
Translations
إصْطِلاحي
terminologický
terminološki
szaknyelviterminológiai
fræîiorîa-
terminologický
terminolojik

terminological

[ˌtɜːmɪnəˈlɒdʒɪkəl] ADJterminológico

terminological

terminology

(təːmiˈnolədʒi) plural termiˈnologies noun
the special words or phrases used in a particular art, science etc. legal terminology; Every science has its own terminology.
ˌterminoˈlogical adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Which British politician introduced the expression "Terminological inexactitude", a euphemism for a lie or untruth?
Clearly the questions posed in the asset statement are designed by lawyers to be as ambiguous as is possible to be facilitating terminological inexactitudes if not downright lies.
What is the exact terminological status of the two adjectives in tourism?
Those who believe it incumbent upon them to assume either an "afairist" or an "agnostic" position vis-a-vis the tooth fairy (or leprechauns or fire-breathing dragons or Santa Claus) must find it even more imperative to draw similar terminological distinctions with respect to God, the Greek and Roman deities (don't forget the goddesses), and the divinities conceived in the collective minds of countless other civilizations, past and present.
It describes the characteristic features of library and information science development despite linguistic and terminological differences, and the network of influences among European pioneers from the first quarter of the 19th century to the last quarter of the 20th century, including Eugene Morel, Suzanne Briet, Bozo Tezak, Niels Lund, and Paul Otlet.
It was coined as part of an original terminological apparatus by Dokulil (1962) to describe WF rules in modern Czech.
Yet even such a self-evident terminological contradiction as an "officer in the field" never seems to occur to the leaders of the human world who appoint them.
Could it be that now their terminological inexactitudes have been exposed as blatant lies and the innumerable pitfalls involved in an exodus have been laid bare, that the public would opt to stay?
"Terminological inexactitude" is what Winston Churchill would have called called it.
She, on the other hand commends her own ministers for using the (eg red bus) terminological inexactitudes of Boris Johnson subsequently.
The making of dictionaries of technical terms is called terminological lexicography.