termitary


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ter·mi·tar·y

 (tûr′mĭ-tĕr′ē)
n. pl. ter·mi·tar·ies
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

termitary

(ˈtɜːmɪtərɪ)
n, pl -ries
a termite nest
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ter•mi•tar•i•um

(ˌtɜr mɪˈtɛər i əm)

n., pl. -tar•i•a (-ˈtɛər i ə)
a termites' nest.
[1860–65; < New Latin termit(ēs), pl. of termes termite]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
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Brave New World is, quite unmistakably, a liberal's cautionary tale regarding tendencies in contemporary life that its author finds abhorrent and which, if left unchallenged and unchecked, could lead in the future to society's conversion into a communitarian state built on the anonymizing model of a termite society, a "termitary," entirely bereft of personal nuance and individual rights (Huxley 1958, 30).
Eugene Marais, the depressive South African naturalist and journalist of the early twentieth century, should be considered the first philosopher of the termitary, a man who spent much of his life puzzling out the dimensions of the swarm and its meaning.