terraced


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ter·race

 (tĕr′ĭs)
n.
1.
a. A porch or walkway bordered by colonnades.
b. A platform extending outdoors from a floor of a house or apartment building.
2. An open, often paved area adjacent to a house serving as an outdoor living space; a patio.
3. A raised bank of earth having vertical or sloping sides and a flat top: turning a hillside into a series of ascending terraces for farming.
4. A flat, narrow stretch of ground, often having a steep slope facing a river, lake, or sea.
5.
a. A row of buildings erected on raised ground or on a sloping site.
b. A section of row houses.
c. Abbr. Ter. or Terr. A residential street, especially along the top or slope of a hill.
6. A narrow strip of landscaped earth in the middle of a street.
tr.v. ter·raced, ter·rac·ing, ter·rac·es
1. To provide (a house, for example) with a terrace or terraces.
2. To form (a hillside or sloping lawn, for example) into terraces.

[French, from Old French, from Old Provençal terrassa, from Vulgar Latin *terrācea, feminine of *terrāceus, earthen, from Latin terra, earth; see ters- in Indo-European roots.]

terraced

(ˈtɛrəst)
adj
1. having horizontal flat areas of ground
2. (Building) Brit (of a street) having a row of usually identical houses with common dividing walls
3. (Building) Brit (of a property) being one of a row of usually identical houses with common dividing walls
Translations
stupňovitý
terrasseret
rivi-
nanizan
テラスを設けた
계단식의
terrasserad
ทำให้ลดหลั่นเป็นชั้น
theo dãy

terraced

[ˈterəst] ADJ (= layered) [hillside, garden] → en terrazas, terraplenado; (= in a row) [house, cottage] → adosado
terraced gardensjardines mpl formando terrazas, jardines mpl colgantes

terraced

[ˈtɛrəst] adj
[garden] → en terrasses; [hillside] → en terrassesterrace house terraced house n (British)maison f mitoyenne (faisant partie d'une rangée de maisons identiques)

terraced

adj
hillside etcterrassenförmig or stufenförmig angelegt; gardenin Terrassen angelegt
(esp Brit) streetmit Reihenhäusern; terraced houseReihenhaus nt

terraced

[ˈtɛrɪst] adj (layered, hillside, garden) → terrazzato/a, a terrazze; (in a row, house, cottage) → a schiera

terraced

مُزَوَّدٌ بِشُرْفَة stupňovitý terrasseret terrassenförmig με πεζούλι adosado en hilera, en bancales rivi- en terrasses nanizan a schiera テラスを設けた 계단식의 van terrassen voorzien terrasseformet w zabudowie szeregowej escalonado, ladeado террасированный terrasserad ทำให้ลดหลั่นเป็นชั้น sıra evler theo dãy 梯状的
References in classic literature ?
Then there came at last the sound for which he had been listening, the rustle of a skirt along the terraced way.
At the other end of the scale, some terraced houses in County Durham were bought for just [pounds sterling]20,000, making them the least expensive homes sold in the North East in June.
The most expensive residential sale taking place in July 2018 was of a terraced property in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, London for PS18,500,000.
Harcourt Terrace, Mountain Ash: PS20,000 First up, and hitting the PS20,000 mark on our cheapest Welsh homes round-up, is a terraced house in Penrhiwceiber.
The site includes the main school, science block, art department and terraced properties on Eskdale Terrace and Eslington Terrace.
The site includes the main school, the science block, the art department and terraced properties on Eskdale Terrace and Eslington Terrace.
IT'S an image synonymous with the Welsh Valleys - the traditional terraced houses nestling in their close knit former mining communities Whether in the Rhymney Valley or the Rhondda, the sight of terracing clinging to the sides of hills and mountains is part of our heritage.
TERRACED properties are proving to be the most popular choice of property for landlords.
TERRACED houses increased in value by more than any other type of home over the past decade after buyers were priced out of the top end of the market, according to research released yesterday.
Terraced properties saw their share of all house sales rise by more than any other property over the decade, increasing to 34% from 31%.