terracing


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Related to terracing: alley cropping

ter·race

 (tĕr′ĭs)
n.
1.
a. A porch or walkway bordered by colonnades.
b. A platform extending outdoors from a floor of a house or apartment building.
2. An open, often paved area adjacent to a house serving as an outdoor living space; a patio.
3. A raised bank of earth having vertical or sloping sides and a flat top: turning a hillside into a series of ascending terraces for farming.
4. A flat, narrow stretch of ground, often having a steep slope facing a river, lake, or sea.
5.
a. A row of buildings erected on raised ground or on a sloping site.
b. A section of row houses.
c. Abbr. Ter. or Terr. A residential street, especially along the top or slope of a hill.
6. A narrow strip of landscaped earth in the middle of a street.
tr.v. ter·raced, ter·rac·ing, ter·rac·es
1. To provide (a house, for example) with a terrace or terraces.
2. To form (a hillside or sloping lawn, for example) into terraces.

[French, from Old French, from Old Provençal terrassa, from Vulgar Latin *terrācea, feminine of *terrāceus, earthen, from Latin terra, earth; see ters- in Indo-European roots.]

terracing

(ˈtɛrəsɪŋ)
n
1. a series of terraces, esp one dividing a slope into a steplike system of flat narrow fields
2. (Building) the act of making a terrace or terraces
3. (Soccer) another name for terrace7a
4. (Rugby) another name for terrace7a
Translations

terracing

n no pl
(on land) → Terrassen pl
(Brit Sport) → Ränge pl

terracing

[ˈtɛrəsɪŋ] n (Agr) → terrazzamento (Brit) (Sport) the terracingle gradinate
References in periodicals archive ?
A number of studies and reports have claimed that the rice terracesarebeing threatened with a loss of indigenous flora and fauna, watershed destruction, unregulated land use conversion, reduced farm labor due to massive outmigration, abandonment and shift of economic activities and the loss of interest in culture and rice terracing by the younger generation.
Baguilat noted an attractive simplicity to the terracing system of Ifugao, which is essentially an ecological management system.
Keesing, Acabado said, pored over early Spanish documents for "descriptions of rice terracing systems in Ifugao and was unable to find any mention of rice terracing tradition until 1801."
IT'S an image synonymous with the Welsh Valleys - the traditional terraced houses nestling in their close knit former mining communities Whether in the Rhymney Valley or the Rhondda, the sight of terracing clinging to the sides of hills and mountains is part of our heritage.
Conservation practices, including terracing, have contributed to this reduction, with an overall decrease in U.S.
Prices: Terracing - Adults pounds 9, Under 16s pounds 3, Senior citizens pounds 6.
Terracing is a practice to reduce runoff, soil erosion, and sediment delivery from upland areas by constructing broad channels across the slope of rolling land.
It was in fact increasing demand for wine that explains the last and largest expansion of terracing in the 19th century, the period when they were most widespread, at least in the western Mediterranean.
Geography of terracing. Considering the benefits of terracing to steep land agriculture, it is surprising that scholars have reported and analyzed terraces in only a few regions of the Maya Lowlands.
THERE'S just something about the feeling of watching the beautiful game standing up on the hard and cold concrete of the terracing.