territorialism


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ter·ri·to·ri·al·ism

 (tĕr′ĭ-tôr′ē-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. A social system that gives authority and influence in a state to the landowners.
2. A system of church government based on primacy of civil power.

ter′ri·to′ri·al·ist n.

territorialism

(ˌtɛrɪˈtɔːrɪəlɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a social system under which the predominant force in the state is the landed class
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a former Protestant theory that the civil government has the right to determine the religious beliefs of the subjects of a state
ˌterriˈtorialist n

territorialism

1. the principle of the political predominance of the landed classes; landlordism.
2. the theory of church policy vesting supreme ecclesiastical authority in a civil government, as in 16th-century Germany. Also called territorial system. — territorialist, n.
See also: Politics
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References in periodicals archive ?
One afternoon, when I came across a roadside pullout where a set of local 20-somethings were parked and taking in the view, a sense of territorialism peaked.
There is also a certain amount of academic (and press) territorialism around Basquiat that creates barriers where there should be collaboration.
Thus, in aiming to avoid "methodological territorialism," which formulates research questions and concepts in terms of spatial territories, "this book breaks away from the traditional notions of bounded ethnic groups and the tug of the urban centres to show interwoven social interactions that are constitutive of identity-making processes and ever-changing linguistic practices" (p.
Territorialism is the behavior of defending a feeding area and factors related to the density of the fish in an area can also influence the territoriality in a population (Holbrook & Schmitt, 2002).
The surf culture remains defined by territorialism and hazing rituals, and Johnny's initiation is only permitted once he bests Bodhi in an impromptu game of beach football.
Despite the alleged vagueness of globalization theory, we can build on the heroic attempts mentioned in the previous section to move beyond what is termed "methodological territorialism," (30) which is arguably embedded in the very definition of "international" relations, by further discussing the relevance of global governance and of regional governance as useful tools in theorizing about international relations across different issue areas, ranging from economic crises to environmental challenges.
1,14) These legal and political barriers were often driven by physicians' territorialism, needs for status and culture.
Tier initial reaction was to be frustrated by territorialism.
One aspect of this is territorialism which is displayed when people seek to be part of a group, fear groups who are different, and defend one's own group, thus, enabling the protection of territories (Clifford, 2009).
This is referred to as territorialism, 8 a system characterized by a multiplicity of proceedings and resulting inefficiencies.
The point to be made is that, while roles in the library are clearly differentiated based on academic credentials, the functionality of these roles can entail considerable overlap, and this intersection fosters territorialism and mitigates opportunities for collaboration.