territorialism


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ter·ri·to·ri·al·ism

 (tĕr′ĭ-tôr′ē-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. A social system that gives authority and influence in a state to the landowners.
2. A system of church government based on primacy of civil power.

ter′ri·to′ri·al·ist n.

territorialism

(ˌtɛrɪˈtɔːrɪəlɪzəm)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) a social system under which the predominant force in the state is the landed class
2. (Ecclesiastical Terms) a former Protestant theory that the civil government has the right to determine the religious beliefs of the subjects of a state
ˌterriˈtorialist n

territorialism

1. the principle of the political predominance of the landed classes; landlordism.
2. the theory of church policy vesting supreme ecclesiastical authority in a civil government, as in 16th-century Germany. Also called territorial system. — territorialist, n.
See also: Politics
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References in periodicals archive ?
Addressing his opposition colleagues, the MPLA MP said that they only talk about functional gradualism and remove the part that the Constitution deals with what territorial territorialism is essentially.
strict territorialism, partial territorialism, citizenship, domestic
In addition, the Criminal Code and the Administrative Penalty Act adopt territorialism, meaning that Taiwanese authorities have jurisdiction and the right to judge whoever violates the relevant laws or regulations in Taiwan.
The territorialism of parking is rarely a laughing matter for those who defend the a few square metres of space outside their houses with the fanatical zeal medieval warlords once applied to moats and drawbridges.
The territorialism of parking is rarely a laughing matter for those who defend the few square metres outside their houses with the fanatical zeal medieval warlords once applied to moats and drawbridges.
Given these benefits, Professors Wessels, Markell, and Kilborn understandably claim that "universalism in one form or another commands virtually undisputed superiority over territorialism." (24) Professor Westbrook, in support of the principle, logically notes that multinational companies in distress require a unitary, conclusive proceeding for all stakeholders globally, and that any other action would only be "a temporary accommodation" subject to upset at any time.
"Fitting the Zeitgeist: Jewish Territorialism and Geopolitics, 1934-1960." Contemporary European History 27, no.
While a worldwide "return to territorialism" remains a major challenge according to 74% of the report's surveyed CEOs in Saudi Arabia, the top bosses are intently pursuing growth in the kingdom, where urbanisation and modernisation offer promising prospects.
Meanwhile, Saudi CEOs rank "return to territorialism" as one of the key challenges to their growth, with 74 percent finding it as one of the top three risks faced by their organization.
Meanwhile, Saudi CEOs rank "return to territorialism" as one of the key challenges to their growth, with 74 per cent finding it as one of the top three risks faced by their organisation.
[modus operandi] (and some territorialism), so it's rare to get enough approach consistency to share work between locations.
"Maybe there is some territorialism going on, or maybe they are preferentially selecting these locations based on their different foraging mechanisms.