tetralogy

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te·tral·o·gy

 (tĕ-trăl′ə-jē, -trŏl′-)
n. pl. te·tral·o·gies
1. A series of four related dramatic, operatic, or literary works.
2. Medicine A complex of four symptoms.

[Greek tetralogiā : tetra-, tetra- + -logos, word, saying; see -logy.]

tetralogy

(tɛˈtrælədʒɪ)
n, pl -gies
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a series of four related works, as in drama or opera
2. (Theatre) (in ancient Greece) a group of four dramas, the first three tragic and the last satiric
3. (Pathology) pathol a group of four symptoms present in one disorder, esp Fallot's tetralogy
[C17: from Greek tetralogia; see tetra-, -logy]

te•tral•o•gy

(tɛˈtræl ə dʒi, -ˈtrɑ lə-)

n., pl. -gies.
1. a series of four related dramas, operas, novels, etc.
2. a group of four dramas, three tragedies and one satyr play, performed consecutively at the festival of Dionysus in ancient Athens.
[1650–60; < Greek tetralogía]

tetralogy

Greek Drama, a series of four dramas, three of them tragedies and one a satyr-play; hence, any series of four related works, literary, dramatic, operatic, etc.
See also: Drama
a series of four related works. — tetralogist, n. — tetralogical, adj.
See also: Literature
any series of four related works, literary, dramatic, operatic, etc.
See also: Music
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tetralogy - a series of four related works (plays or operas or novels)
serial, series - a serialized set of programs; "a comedy series"; "the Masterworks concert series"
Translations

te·tral·o·gy

n. tetralogía, término aplicado a una combinación de cuatro factores o elementos.
References in periodicals archive ?
His topics include sex and magic in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay, Puritan magic in Doctor Faustus, ambiguous magic in Shakespeare's first and second tetralogies, Macbeth and the Jacobean witchcraft plays, magic as emasculation in George Chapman and Ben Jonson, and the magician's garden in The Tempest and Comus.
Leaving the city streets for the playhouse, chapter 3, "Shakespeare's London: The Scene of London in the Second Tetralogy and Henry VIII," zooms through the first and second tetralogies before arriving at Henry VIII.
The First Tetralogy was one of three Tetralogies traditionally attributed to Antiphon.
The two tetralogies, then, seek to institute a masculine dramatic agency that uses the feminized stage to create what female authority cannot contain.