tetrameter


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te·tram·e·ter

 (tĕ-trăm′ĭ-tər)
n.
1.
a. Verse written in lines of four metrical feet.
b. A single line of such verse.
2.
a. Classical quantitative verse consisting of four measures of two feet each, especially in iambic, trochaic, or anapestic meter.
b. A single line of such verse.

[Late Latin tetrametrus, from Greek tetrametron, from neuter of tetrametros, having four measures : tetra-, tetra- + -metron, measure; see -meter.]

te·tram′e·ter adj.

tetrameter

(tɛˈtræmɪtə)
n
1. (Poetry) a line of verse consisting of four metrical feet
2. (Poetry) a verse composed of such lines
3. (Poetry) (in classical prosody) a line of verse composed of four dipodies

te•tram•e•ter

(tɛˈtræm ɪ tər)

n.
1. a verse of four feet.
2. a line of classical verse consisting of four dipodies in trochaic, iambic, or anapestic meter.
adj.
3. consisting of four metrical feet.
[1605–15; < Latin tetrametrus < Greek tetrámetros having four measures. See tetra-, meter2]

tetrameter

1. a verse of four feet.
2. Classical Prosody. a verse consisting of four dipodies in trochaic, iambic, or anapestic meter. — tetrameter, adj.
See also: Verse

tetrameter

A meter of four feet to the line.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tetrameter - a verse line having four metrical feet
verse line, verse - a line of metrical text
Translations

tetrameter

[teˈtræmɪtəʳ] Ntetrámetro m

tetrameter

n (Liter) → Tetrameter m
References in classic literature ?
The iambic measure then replaced the trochaic tetrameter, which was originally employed when the poetry was of the Satyric order, and had greater affinities with dancing.
But oh, mesdames, if you are not allowed to touch the heart sometimes in spite of syntax, and are not to be loved until you all know the difference between trimeter and tetrameter, may all Poetry go to the deuce, and every schoolmaster perish miserably!
Meter or rhythm: moraic tetrameter in Japanese poetry.
Chapter 1 deals with poems composed of masculine-rhymed amphibrachic tetrameter couplets.
The first volume includes five articles ("The Conversational Tradition in Chinese Philosophy," "Confucius and Ancient Chinese Literary Criticism," "Les premiers vers pentasyllabiques dates dans la poesie chinoise," "On the Authenticity of the Tetrameter Poetry Attributed to Ruan Ji," and "Literary Criticism in China in the Early Third Century AD") dating from 1956 to 1989, plus the complete 1996 book entitled Landscape Appreciation in Ancient and Early Medieval China: The Birth of Landscape Poetry.
These books of "anapestic tetrameter" verse and zany drawings are treated in the ways that art historians reflect on museum objects, i.e.
If you remember learning that Robert Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is a poem about suicide written in iambic tetrameter ("The woods are Lovely, DARK and DEEP"), then The Sounds of Poetry will set you free.
It certainly avoids the drumbeat monotony of Longfellow's pounding tetrameter trochees--alleged in most accounts to be the author's improbably native-sounding attempt to approximate epic formula, albeit arising out of transliteration of a German rendering of the Finnish original.
Duggan closes the book with a powerful restatement of Northup's view that the metre of Pearl is iambic tetrameter, and that editors of the poem, in following too slavishly the orthography of the scribe, have obscured the poet's metre.
In the ballad stanza, where the story is generally rendered in four iambic lines (the first and third being tetrameter and others trimeter, with the second and fourth lines rhyming), the song is characteristically condensed, dramatic, and impersonal.
Marquand but fired him shortly after he pointed out in a creative staff meeting that a Lifebuoy soap slogan ("Every day an oily coating lightly forms upon your skin") scanned in trochaic tetrameter.
In them, a monometer consists of one dipody (or two feet), a dimeter of four feet, a trimeter of six feet, and a tetrameter of eight feet.