tetrameter

(redirected from tetrameters)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

te·tram·e·ter

 (tĕ-trăm′ĭ-tər)
n.
1.
a. Verse written in lines of four metrical feet.
b. A single line of such verse.
2.
a. Classical quantitative verse consisting of four measures of two feet each, especially in iambic, trochaic, or anapestic meter.
b. A single line of such verse.

[Late Latin tetrametrus, from Greek tetrametron, from neuter of tetrametros, having four measures : tetra-, tetra- + -metron, measure; see -meter.]

te·tram′e·ter adj.

tetrameter

(tɛˈtræmɪtə)
n
1. (Poetry) a line of verse consisting of four metrical feet
2. (Poetry) a verse composed of such lines
3. (Poetry) (in classical prosody) a line of verse composed of four dipodies

te•tram•e•ter

(tɛˈtræm ɪ tər)

n.
1. a verse of four feet.
2. a line of classical verse consisting of four dipodies in trochaic, iambic, or anapestic meter.
adj.
3. consisting of four metrical feet.
[1605–15; < Latin tetrametrus < Greek tetrámetros having four measures. See tetra-, meter2]

tetrameter

1. a verse of four feet.
2. Classical Prosody. a verse consisting of four dipodies in trochaic, iambic, or anapestic meter. — tetrameter, adj.
See also: Verse

tetrameter

A meter of four feet to the line.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.tetrameter - a verse line having four metrical feet
verse line, verse - a line of metrical text
Translations

tetrameter

[teˈtræmɪtəʳ] Ntetrámetro m

tetrameter

n (Liter) → Tetrameter m
References in classic literature ?
The iambic measure then replaced the trochaic tetrameter, which was originally employed when the poetry was of the Satyric order, and had greater affinities with dancing.
But oh, mesdames, if you are not allowed to touch the heart sometimes in spite of syntax, and are not to be loved until you all know the difference between trimeter and tetrameter, may all Poetry go to the deuce, and every schoolmaster perish miserably!
It is enjambed (between metrical lines l and 2), varied (between the pentameter of metrical line 1 and the tetrameters in metrical lines 2 and 3), and antimelismatic (e.
Note: This poem consists of nine stanzas of iambic tetrameters and
12) Moreover, Donne's stanzas regularly interlace a sequence of three tetrameters and three pentameters, a trimeter in the sixth line, and a pair of tetrameter lines to conclude each stanza; this structure is opposed to the more conventional final alexandrine, in which the main verb generally makes its appearance, belatedly clarifiing the syntax and creating a brief resting place.
Cheevy" has some of that but shows him at his most inventive as well; the cross-rhyming quatrains run at tetrameters for three lines before coming to a clunking halt in the dimeter fourth line.
His rendition of Pushkin's rhymed iambic tetrameters into unrhymed lines of the same meter gives a more accurate impression of how natural the poem sounds in Russian than a rhymed translation likely would have.
One of Cummings's most anthologized and analyzed poems, it tells the love story of "anyone" and "noone" in dactylic tetrameters.
Suddenly my magical world of words and feeling had turned into "iambic pentameters," "dactylic tetrameters," "rhyme schemes" and "lineation.
I could not find a way to reproduce in English the urgent tetrameters of the opening lines, followed by the stammer midstanza, and the disarming rhythmic break of the poem's final question.
Vendler's roomy chapters include gatherings of Yeats's tetrameters, blank verse, sonnets, ballads, and rhymed stanzas (in particular the ottava rima stanza, which the poet took from Shelley and Byron and made fully his own).