tetrarchy


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tet·rar·chy

 (tĕt′rär′kē, tē′trär′-) also tet·rar·chate (-kāt′, -kĭt)
n. pl. tet·rar·chies also tet·rar·chates
1. The area ruled by a tetrarch.
2.
a. Joint rule by four governors.
b. The four governors so ruling.

tetrarchy

1. the Roman practice of dividing authority over provinces among four governors.
2. a system of rule by four authorities. — tetrarch, tetrarchate, n.tetrarchic, tetrarchical, adj.
See also: Government
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Mulvagh's central argument is that the post-1900 IPP leadership should not be seen simply in terms of John Redmond's leadership, but as a small oligarchy of four or "tetrarchy": Redmond, John Dillon, the Belfast MP Joseph Devlin as organizer-in-chief and heir presumptive and the British-based T.P, O'Connor as advisor and, linkman to British high politics.
From Septimius Severus to the Tetrarchy (Studies of the Rural World in the Roman Period, 3).
Most notable was his creation in 293 of the Tetrarchy ("rule by four") in which the empire was divided between East and West, each half ruled by a senior emperor, or augustos, and an assistant emperor, or caesar, who, upon the death or disability of the senior emperor, would assume supreme power.
When I look at a source document on Constantine, say Life of Constantine (VC) by Eusebius of Caesarea, the story of that Emperor's rise from a son of one of four Caesar's--the tetrarchy instituted by Diocletian--to the triumphant Christian Emperor is not actually those events at all.
Thus, parallels with pagan Greco-Roman cults, the complex diarchy and tetrarchy of the hierarchical Roman Empire, and the birthing of the two later three powers of the Christian God.
Bill LEADBETTER, The Illegitimacy of Constantine and the Birth of the Tetrarchy, en Samuel N.
(29) Since Tiberius came to power in AD 14; this places Philip died in AD 33 or AD 34, which places the commencement of his tetrarchy in 4 BC or 3 BC.
Googling a runner Trachonitis 4.45 Southwell Trachonitis was a region that once formed part of Herod Philip's tetrarchy. It now lies within the boundaries of modern Syria.
Herod's subjection to the Roman Empire ironically mirrors the playwright's relationship to the English public that grants Wilde his literary "Tetrarchy." The presence of the Roman Empire is reiterated several times in Salome, establishing Rome as the source of Herod's authority.
Lenski refers to "scholae palatinae" while Evans labels them "Scholarians," and Lenski's summary of the Tetrarchy, while germane to Constantine's elevation to power, is redundant following Corcoran's chapter, and could have been edited in a smoother way.
Van Dam argues that the changing religious policies of first, the Tetrarchy, and later, Constantine, had problematized "religion" as a category within early fourth-century diplomatic discourse.