textism

textism

(ˈtɛkstɪzəm)
n
a word or abbreviation typically used in a text message
References in periodicals archive ?
When we are talking about the new movements in e-literature, we need to be aware that such a textual and post-textual practice articulated with linguistic and non-linguistic signifiers is embedded in the present culture shaped by the software (in terms of mind- and perception shifter), ubiquitous computing, Internet language (textism, netspeak), web remixability, and the repurposing of various cultural platforms and contents.
But a year-long study on a group of eight to ten-year-olds by city-based psychologist Dr Clare Wood found "sophisticated literacy skills" were needed to use textism.
In a small study of 63 children between the ages of 8 and 12, psychologist Clare Wood found that levels of text speak ("textism") were good predictors of reading ability.
"What Rabbie did was accent stylisation - a type of textism.
This textual prejudice becomes a special target of Steinberg's scorn: "Textism as I define it is an interdictory stance, hostile to any interpretation that seems to come out of nowhere because it comes out of pictures, as if pictures alone did not constitute a respectable provenance.
"We were surprised to learn that not only was the association strong but that textism use was actually driving the development of phonological awareness and reading skill in children.
"What Rabbie did was accent stylisation - a type of textism. Writing 'nite' or 'skool' does not break the rules of language.
Textism - a word or abbreviation typically used in a text message
The research found evidence of a "significant contribution of textism use to the children's spelling development during the study".
The participants took 14 seconds to read the normal English message, but 27 seconds to comprehend the textism message, and in many cases made mistakes, reports ABC Online.
According to a recent study from Binghamton University, State University of New York, emoticons, irregular spellings and exclamation points in text messages aren't sloppy - these "textisms" actually help convey meaning and intent in the absence of spoken conversation.
(2010).The relationship between "textisms" and formal and informal writing among young adults.Communication Research, 37(3), 420-440.