textualism


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tex·tu·al·ism

 (tĕks′cho͞o-ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. A theory of legal interpretation emphasizing the importance of the everyday meanings of the words used in statutes.
2. Strict adherence to a text, especially of the Scriptures.
3. Textual criticism, especially of the Scriptures.

tex′tu·al·ist n.

textualism

(ˈtɛkstjʊəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. doctrinaire adherence to a text, esp of the Bible
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) textual criticism, esp of the Bible
ˈtextualist n, adj

textualism

the practice of adhering strictly to the Scriptures. — textualist, textuary, n.
See also: Bible
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
(94) To promote uniformity in court decisions, courts should either correctly apply the Chevron process, or choose to follow the growing trend of new textualism (95) and extend Dodd-Frank anti-relation protections both to employees who report only internally as well as those who report directly to the SEC.
Implicitly throughout the book and explicitly in the conclusion, Lesser takes up the question of editing after the New Textualism. He points out that the Arden 3 Hamlet, rooted in the New Textualist mode, refuses to decide what Hamlet is--what makes the three early texts versions of the same play.
(3) For those keeping track at home, this means that the New Textualism (also known as "textual studies" and "new materialism") called into question the central, organizing tenets of the New Bibliography, which had remained dominant throughout much of the twentieth century.
203) to "Parola scenica in Verdi and his Critics," which presents a survey of critical texts on Verdi's approach to textualism and melody.
He talks about the "textualist sinkhole," and that textualism as a tool is tidy yet "their clarity is won through limitation." In this way, his arguments begin as critique and end in animosity.
3) in notable critical debates in New Textualism and the history of the book.
(6) This objective approach, which is broadly referred to in the United States as textualism, is based on the plain-meaning rule.
He then moves to explaining ontology and epistemology, their differences, and their theory of experience, followed by his examination of social objects, their realism and textualism, objects, acts and inscriptions.
textualism (5-6), to hone in on his pithy application of the intentional thesis in "The Readings" subsection (619).
The contributors to this the third volume in a series addressing the image of the cross in the Anglo-Saxon world approach their subject from a heterogeneous range of academic perspectives--from old-fashioned formalistic textualism to New Media theory--but all are united in getting to the crux of the matter in early Christian art.