thankee

thankee

(ˈθæŋkiː)
interj
informal thank you
References in classic literature ?
In the middle of the wall hung a picture representing a beautiful lady, so young, so glad, but dressed quite as in former times, with clothes that stood quite stiff, and with powder in her hair; she neither said "thankee, thankee!" nor "cranky, cranky!" but looked with her mild eyes at the little boy, who directly asked the old man, "Where did you get her?"
'Well, sir,' he said, bowing and chuckling, and tucking in the ends of his neckerchief at his breast: 'I thankee, sir, I thankee!
"Thankee, thankee, Captain; you grand'ther was of a free and generous mind.
Wife.--But then do you not tell God thankee for that too?
"You see, boys, I dropped in there the other night, when some of you fellers was doin' the high-toned 'thankee, marm' business in the parlor.
"Thankee, miss; you're very kind for your size, I'm sure," said he gratefully.
'Yes,' replied Squeers, staggering in his chair under the congratulatory blow on the chest which the stout Yorkshireman dealt him; 'thankee. Don't do it again.
'Thankee,' said the driver, very deliberately, as he got down; 'my mother was contented with myself, and so am I.
Wouldn't take No thankee. Like a YMCA but cleaner an' quiet." Bill held up his left hand.
It carried a hint of the faithful old retainer touching his forelock and muttering: "Thankee kindly master."
In an era of crass pub blues there's enough foot-tappingly "why thankee maam" soulfulness to convince us that Willie Dixon might have been Mancunian.
Wull, thankee! OK then, bye." He folded the phone and pocketed it.