thankless


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thank·less

 (thăngk′lĭs)
adj.
1. Not feeling or showing gratitude; ungrateful.
2. Not likely to be appreciated: a thankless job.

thank′less·ly adv.
thank′less·ness n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thankless

(ˈθæŋklɪs)
adj
1. receiving no thanks or appreciation: a thankless job.
2. ungrateful: a thankless pupil.
ˈthanklessly adv
ˈthanklessness n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

thank•less

(ˈθæŋk lɪs)

adj.
1. not likely to be appreciated or rewarded: a thankless job.
2. not feeling or expressing gratitude; ungrateful: a thankless child.
[1530–40]
thank′less•ly, adv.
thank′less•ness, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.thankless - not feeling or showing gratitudethankless - not feeling or showing gratitude; "ungrateful heirs"; "How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is / To have a thankless child!"- Shakespeare
2.thankless - not likely to be rewardedthankless - not likely to be rewarded; "grading papers is a thankless task"
unrewarding - not rewarding; not providing personal satisfaction
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

thankless

adjective unrewarding, unappreciated Soccer referees have a thankless task.
rewarding
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

thankless

adjective
1. Not showing or feeling gratitude:
2. Not apt to be appreciated:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
غَيْر مَمنون، غَيْر شاكِر
nevděčný
utaknemmelig
vanòakklátur
iyilikten anlamaznankör

thankless

[ˈθæŋklɪs] ADJ (= unrewarding, ungrateful) → ingrato
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

thankless

[ˈθæŋkləs] adjingrat(e)
it's a thankless task → c'est une tâche ingrate
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

thankless

adjundankbar; a thankless taskeine undankbare Aufgabe
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

thankless

[ˈθæŋklɪs] adj (unrewarding, task) → ingrato/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

thank

(θӕŋk) verb
to express appreciation or gratitude to (someone) for a favour, service, gift etc. He thanked me for the present; She thanked him for inviting her.
ˈthankful adjective
grateful; relieved and happy. He was thankful that the journey was over; a thankful sigh.
ˈthankfully adverb
ˈthankfulness noun
ˈthankless adjective
for which no-one is grateful. Collecting taxes is a thankless task.
ˈthanklessly adverb
ˈthanklessness noun
thanks noun plural
expression(s) of gratitude. I really didn't expect any thanks for helping them.
interjection
thank you. Thanks (very much) for your present; Thanks a lot!; No, thanks; Yes, thanks.
ˈthanksgiving noun
the act of giving thanks, especially to God, eg in a church service. a service of thanksgiving.
Thanksˈgiving noun
(also Thanksgiving Day) in the United States, a special day (the fourth Thursday in November) for giving thanks to God.
thanks to
because of. Thanks to the bad weather, our journey was very uncomfortable.
thank you
I thank you. Thank you (very much) for your present; No, thank you.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
Lonely and sleepless I think of my thankless Master, and vainly would Cradle my sorrow.
She was unanimously elected assistant editor of the Wareham School Pilot, being the first girl to assume that enviable, though somewhat arduous and thankless position, and when her maiden number went to the Cobbs, uncle Jerry and aunt Sarah could hardly eat or sleep for pride.
"I am not thankless, I hope, but that dreadful woman seems to throw a shadow on me and on all my hopes."
'How can you be so thankless to your best friend, Lizzie?
"I may work, it will do no good," I growled; but nevertheless I drew out a packet of letters and commenced my task--task thankless and bitter as that of the Israelite crawling over the sun-baked fields of Egypt in search of straw and stubble wherewith to accomplish his tale of bricks.
His answer to my letter contained a quotation from Shakespeare on the subject of thankless children, but no remittance of money.
Indeed, many of these poor fellows (as the event proved) were upon their last cruise; the deep seas and cannibal fish received them; and it is a thankless business to speak ill of the dead.
Miss Miggs, baffled in all her schemes, matrimonial and otherwise, and cast upon a thankless, undeserving world, turned very sharp and sour; and did at length become so acid, and did so pinch and slap and tweak the hair and noses of the youth of Golden Lion Court, that she was by one consent expelled that sanctuary, and desired to bless some other spot of earth, in preference.
This state of things should have been to me a paradise of peace, accustomed as I was to a life of ceaseless reprimand and thankless fagging; but, in fact, my racked nerves were now in such a state that no calm could soothe, and no pleasure excite them agreeably.
There have been sore mistakes; and my life has been a blind and thankless one; and I want forgiveness and direction far too much, to be bitter with you."
Everybody at all addicted to letter-writing, without having much to say, which will include a large proportion of the female world at least, must feel with Lady Bertram that she was out of luck in having such a capital piece of Mansfield news as the certainty of the Grants going to Bath, occur at a time when she could make no advantage of it, and will admit that it must have been very mortifying to her to see it fall to the share of her thankless son, and treated as concisely as possible at the end of a long letter, instead of having it to spread over the largest part of a page of her own.
Took him home, and made him comfortable, and like a thankless monster he ran away in the night and never has been seen or heard of since till I set eyes on him just now.