thatness

thatness

(ˈðætnəs)
n
the state or quality of being 'that' or having existence
References in periodicals archive ?
Heidegger argues that "the division into whatness and thatness does not just contain a doctrine of metaphysical thinking.
19) Along with Heidegger, then, Fabro insists on what we might call the thatness of facts.
35) The oratio infinitiva is the Latin way of presenting facts in their thatness, so to speak.
At the root of phenomenology is an interrogative approach to the wider world, as Heidegger put it: 'a knowing search for beings in their thatness and their whatness'.
Metaphors bring out the "thisness of a that and the thatness of a this"; they tell us something about one character as considered from the point of view of another character.
If the language of mysticism can be retained, I would argue, it is not a mysticism characterized by the approach to limit states or the dissolution of the senses but by the startling thatness of everyday experience.
In Burke's terms, metaphor brings out the "thisness of a that, the thatness of a this.
Hegel also fails to bring before the mind the existence or thatness of particular, contingent, created things in nature.
Even in the case of existence as such (also called pure actuality or being itself), which is understood to be not just possible but necessary, thought can only entertain the concept of such existence and can never bring the thatness of such existence before the mind by itself.
But he insists against Schelling that thought is directly aware from within itself of the very thatness of being.
65) For Schelling, therefore, to the extent that thought determines in propositions what it is to be X, it can never bring before the mind the very thatness of existing.