thaumaturgical


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thau·ma·tur·gy

 (thô′mə-tûr′jē)
n.
The working of miracles or magic feats.

thau′ma·tur′gic, thau′ma·tur′gi·cal adj.
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thaumaturgical

adjective
Having, brought about by, or relating to supernatural powers or magic:
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
By inserting this compositional element, the illustrators expanded the range of the beneficiaries of the new Muscovite royal woman saint's thaumaturgical power from that of her fellow nuns in the Kremlin monastery to all who believed in her and visited her grave.
EB You've said some musical tricks are cheap, but also "I believed in the thaumaturgical, the wonder work like the kind that snatched my father from the fiery wreck of WWII and dropped him into elementary school." Has music ever transplanted you in such a radical way?
The consequence of adoption of a thaumaturgical etiology were the corresponding diagnostic methods (clairvoyance, revelation, etc.) and treatment techniques (casting spells and charms to cure or prevent an illness), undoing illness spells, etc.
The Florentine duke, for instance, never advanced a claim to thaumaturgical powers or mythical ancestry.
Newspaper columnists angrily blamed the uncritical theocentric attitude held by some Nigerian high officials, who patronise the churches for their much-touted thaumaturgical ability.
Liberation lets go of the "thaumaturgical refuge of x-buddhism" full of "ventriloquized subjects," as the one unthinking one's self as a non-Buddhist enters into exile (121).
(Both are occluded commensurate with the degree of reflexivity.) The word "Buddhist" names a person who has performed a psychologically charged determination that Buddhism provides thaumaturgical refuge.
The production of fairydust stems from two sources: Nimbus Thaumaturgical, a legitimized and legalized distributor of fairydust, and the Nixies, a group of illegal fairydust dealers.
Or again, either we assert divine omnipotence, which entails an interventionist and "thaumaturgical" view of a God who "suspends or bends natural laws so that in the end things turn out just the way God has planned," or God is more like a "weak force" whose actual existence we can never be quite sure of but whose name harbors the "event" of possibility.