atonement

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a·tone·ment

 (ə-tōn′mənt)
n.
1. Amends or reparation made for an injury or wrong; expiation.
2.
a. Judaism An individual's reconciliation with God by means of repentance and confession of one's transgressions.
b. Atonement Christianity The reconciliation of God and humans brought about by the redemptive life and death of Jesus.
3. Obsolete Reconciliation; concord.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

atonement

(əˈtəʊnmənt)
n
1. satisfaction, reparation, or expiation given for an injury or wrong
2. (Theology) (often capital) Christian theol
a. the reconciliation of man with God through the life, sufferings, and sacrificial death of Christ
b. the sufferings and death of Christ
3. (Theology) Christian Science the state in which the attributes of God are exemplified in man
4. obsolete reconciliation or agreement
[C16: from Middle English phrase at onement in harmony]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

a•tone•ment

(əˈtoʊn mənt)

n.
1. satisfaction or reparation for a wrong or injury; amends.
2. (sometimes cap.) the Christian doctrine that the reconciliation of God and humankind will be accomplished through Christ.
3. (in Christian Science) the state in which humankind exemplifies the attributes of Christ.
4. Archaic. reconciliation; agreement.
[1505–15; from phrase at one in harmony + -ment]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.atonement - compensation for a wrongatonement - compensation for a wrong; "we were unable to get satisfaction from the local store"
amends, damages, indemnification, redress, restitution, indemnity - a sum of money paid in compensation for loss or injury
2.atonement - the act of atoning for sin or wrongdoing (especially appeasing a deity)atonement - the act of atoning for sin or wrongdoing (especially appeasing a deity)
redemption, salvation - (theology) the act of delivering from sin or saving from evil
amends, reparation - something done or paid in expiation of a wrong; "how can I make amends"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

atonement

noun amends, payment, compensation, satisfaction, redress, reparation, restitution, penance, recompense, expiation, propitiation True guilt is marked by a willingness to make atonement.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations
odčiněnívykoupení
hyvityssovitus

atonement

[əˈtəʊnmənt] Nexpiación f
to make atonement forenmendar, desagraviar
Day of AtonementDía m de la Expiación
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

atonement

[əˈtəʊnmənt] nexpiation f, réparation f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

atonement

nSühne f, → Buße f; to make atonement for somethingfür etw Sühne or Buße tun; in atonement for somethingals Sühne or Buße für etw; the Atonement (Eccl) → das Sühneopfer (Christi)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

atonement

[əˈtəʊnmənt] n (frm) → espiazione f (Rel) → redenzione f
to make atonement for a mistake → riparare ad un errore
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
He told Mr Rugg that to clear his partner morally, to the fullest extent, and publicly and unreservedly to declare that he, Arthur Clennam, of that Firm, had of his own sole act, and even expressly against his partner's caution, embarked its resources in the swindles that had lately perished, was the only real atonement within his power; was a better atonement to the particular man than it would be to many men; and was therefore the atonement he had first to make.
In the whole of her subsequent manner, she traced the direction of a mind awakened to reasonable exertion; for no sooner had they entered their common sitting-room, than Marianne turned her eyes around it with a look of resolute firmness, as if determined at once to accustom herself to the sight of every object with which the remembrance of Willoughby could be connected.--She said little, but every sentence aimed at cheerfulness, and though a sigh sometimes escaped her, it never passed away without the atonement of a smile.
"Though it is difficult," said Jane, "to guess in what way he can mean to make us the atonement he thinks our due, the wish is certainly to his credit."
It visits the sins of the parents on the children; it encourages vice by depriving fathers and mothers of the strongest of all motives for making the atonement of marriage; and it claims to produce these two abominable results in the names of morality and religion.
Olive was a long-time member and employee of Lutheran Church of the Atonement in Barrington, where she also sang in the choir.
Of course, we must repent to be eligible for the cleansing and forgiving powers of the Atonement, but once we have repented, there is no such thing as a spotted repenter in God's kingdom.
The Atonement Redux project has even won the support of the film's director Joe Wright, who also directed last year's Oscar-winning film Darkest Hour.
He concludes that the biblical data support both the penal-substitution version of the Satisfaction and the Christus Victor theories of the atonement. He also shows how this conclusion is implicit in the exegetical reflections of the early church fathers.
Or is there something more to the Atonement, something in addition to forgiveness for our sins?
Readers with some knowledge of the atonement discussion might skip from the first chapter to the fifth, and then return to the other chapters to get a sense of her critiques.
In this book, Murphy examines the doctrine of the atonement in light of evolutionary biology.
I suspect that recent criticism on Milton and the crucifixion and/ or the atonement may be similarly motivated by the desire to render Milton more like ourselves.