Barren Lands

(redirected from the Barren Grounds)

Bar·ren Lands

or Bar·ren Grounds  (băr′ən)
A treeless, sparsely inhabited region of northern Canada northwest of Hudson Bay and east of the Mackenzie River basin.

Barren Lands

pl n
(Placename) the Barren Lands a region of tundra in N Canada, extending westwards from Hudson Bay: sparsely inhabited, chiefly by Inuit. Also known as: the Barren Grounds
References in periodicals archive ?
Not only was it accomplished in one season (133 days), but it was done at a time when sections of this route were largely unmapped and had not been travelled by Euro-North Americans since the expedition of English explorer Samuel Hearne and Chipewyan leader Matonabee from Churchill across the Barren Grounds to the Coppermine River in 1770-1772, and later by surveyor J.
amp; north to Black Lake & the Barren Grounds 6 days fast travelling in canoes north of Black Lake, 6 July.
Ethingo's map of Wolverene [sic] River and the course northward from Black Lake to the barren grounds and Active Man Lake, which empties northward into a great river that flows north to the sea, 3 August.
Lazan's book is named for the "four perfect pebbles" she sought to gather each day on the barren grounds of the camp, symbolizing her wish that her mother, father, brother and she would survive.
A study of grizzly bears on the barren grounds of Tuktoyaktuk Peninsula and Richards Island, 1974 to 1978.
The only substantial change to camp life on the Barren Grounds in 2000 years is the knowledge that one can be whisked out of trouble with the assistance of radios and planes.
John Richardson and Richard King, surgeon-naturalists with the Franklin and Back expeditions, began the daunting task of describing the natural history of the Athabasca-Mackenzie region and the barren grounds to the north in the 1820s and 1830s.
When Snow Man originally appeared in 1931, it joined previously published books--such as Warburton Pike's The Barren Ground of Northern Canada (London and New York, 1892), Caspar Whitney's On Snow-Shoes to the Barren Grounds (New York, 1896), J.
In his quest for realistic wildlife film footage of the caribou en masse, it was to this vicinity that Tolstoy headed, as did Francis Harper twenty years later when undertaking his important study of the barren ground caribou.