hyaline

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hy·a·line

 (hī′ə-lĭn, -līn′)
adj.
Resembling glass, as in translucence or transparency; glassy.
n.
1. Something that is translucent or transparent.
2. Variant of hyalin.

[Late Latin hyalinus, from Greek hualinos, of glass, from hualos, glass.]

hyaline

(ˈhaɪəlɪn)
adj
1. (Zoology) biology clear and translucent, with no fibres or granules
2. archaic transparent
n
archaic a glassy transparent surface
[C17: from Late Latin hyalinus, from Greek hualinos of glass, from hualos glass]

hy•a•line

(n. ˈhaɪ əˌlin, -lɪn; adj. -lɪn, -ˌlaɪn)

n.
1. Also, hy•a•lin (lɪn)
a. a horny substance found in hydatid cysts, closely resembling chitin.
b. a structureless, transparent substance found in cartilage, the eye, etc., resulting from the pathological degeneration of tissue.
2. something glassy or transparent.
adj.
3. of or pertaining to hyaline.
4. glassy or transparent.
[1655–65; < Late Latin hyalinus < Greek hyálinos of glass]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hyaline - a glassy translucent substance that occurs in hyaline cartilage or in certain skin conditionshyaline - a glassy translucent substance that occurs in hyaline cartilage or in certain skin conditions
keratohyalin - hyaline in the large granules of the stratum granulosum
translucent substance, transparent substance - a material having the property of admitting light diffusely; a partly transparent material
Adj.1.hyaline - resembling glass in transparency or translucency; "the morning is as clear as diamond or as hyaline"-Sacheverell Sitwell
clear - allowing light to pass through; "clear water"; "clear plastic bags"; "clear glass"; "the air is clear and clean"
Translations

hy·a·line

a. hialino-a, vítreo-a o casi transparente;
___ castcilindro ___, que se observa en la orina;
___ membrane diseaseenfermedad de la membrana ___, trastorno repiratorio que se manifiesta en recién nacidos.
References in periodicals archive ?
The presence of cartilage in MMMT is considered a favorable prognostic factor.8 Uterine sarcoma accounts for 3-5% of all corpus uteri malignancies; undifferentiated uterine sarcomas arise from the endometrium or myometrium, lacking any resemblance to normal endometrium and may show heterologous stromal elements in the form of cartilage, bone or rhabdomyoblasts.9 In our case the hyaline cartilage nodules were mostly located deep in the myometrium, close to the serosal surface and adjacent tissue exhibited foci of adenomyosis; the closest differential diagnosis ruminated was adenosarcoma.
The distinguishing features of HTT in cytology are the radial arrangement of cohesive tumour cells surrounding the hyaline material, whirling parallel arrays, vague, curved nuclear palisading, spindled or elongated cells, ill-defined cell borders, faintly stained, abundant, filamentous cytoplasm, frequent intranuclear grooves, pseudoinclusions, perinuclear halo, haemorrhagic background, lack of papillary architecture and sheet-like arrangement.
The hyaline membranes of the acute phase are incorporated into the alveolar septa through phagocytosis by macrophages or granulation tissue formation by proliferating myofibroblasts.
Furthermore, in terms of application, the hyaline cartilage repair and regeneration market accounts for the largest share in 2016.
Due to their poor healing and regenerative potential, injuries involving the hyaline cartilage are challenging to treat, particularly in the young and athletic population.
The hyaline rings were found in detached biopsy fragments or embedded within colonic lamina propria and granulation tissue.
The hyaline material is Congo-red and periodic acid-Schiff-positive but diastase-resistant (3).
As an echinoid embryo develops, adjacent blastomeres are linked by adhesive bonds; in many cases, the developing embryo is also surrounded by an extracellular matrix, termed the hyaline layer.
The hyaline rings appeared marked and well-defined throughout the otolith, which facilitated the reading of the otoliths (Fig.
The hyaline deposits in the biopsies examined consist of a carbohydrate-protein complex containing hyaluronic acid and probably chondroitin-sulphate plus large amounts of lipids.20
However, in hull-less seeds, the three middle layers were collapsed into the hyaline, without any trace of lignin in the testa (Table 1; Fig.