theandric

theandric

(θiːˈændrɪk)
adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) relating to the state of being both divine and human, esp pertaining to Christ
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
Its commitment to witnessing to the world is nourished by its theandric character, which is not of this world.
Ever since the first Christian centuries, in their devotion to the Holy Virgin Mary, the faithful have honoured her more than any other holy person, as she is above all saints because she is closer to Jesus Christ "through the theandric unity between Mother and Son" (Balasa 1991: 24), thus being "more honourable than the Cherubim and more glorious beyond compare than the Seraphim."
The divine trait of beingness as hypostasis allows the movement of the divine hypostases within Godhead, towards one another and towards the human being, constituting what Tudor Ghideanu called "the theandric sense of love" (40).
connects that fundamental understanding of revelation with a profound theology of the word of God, of which the most specific characteristic might arguably be its sacramentality, that is, its theandric potential to engraft humanity onto divinity.
The Church as a Theandric organism cannot but interact with the social milieu, cannot but look for a language to communicate those who are to listen to the Gospel.
The core Christian doctrine of the full humanity and full divinity of Christ poses a challenging mystery, to be sure, and Casey cites the term "theandric" coined by ancient theologians to name the union of divine and human natures in the unique form of the Incarnation as an example of the difficulties we face in conceptualizing the reality named by this doctrine (1).
Instead, Merton held in theandric tension both revelation and reason:
According to Blondel, the phenomenon of action necessarily requires a theandric orientation to "the presence of something supernatural which could not be defined philosophically but had to be affirmed in its necessity as a principle of being for action." He held tenaciously to this conviction for the remainder of his life.
"After Chalcedon: The Oneness of Christ and the Dyothelite Mediation of his Theandric Unity." Modern Theology 24.2 (April 2008): 199-224.
What is coming into view in our age--partly as a result of secularization--is the perspective of a "theandric" or else "cosmotheandric" ontonomy which stresses the integral connection between the divine, the human, and nature (or the cosmos).
This celestial fire of theandric genius is precisely the kind of force by which are "projected" civilizations such as the human.
Particularly well known is what he described as "this twofold truth [double verite] we would call a dialectic of'gift [le donne] and task [/'agz]'; it is closely bound up with the mystery of the theandric reality of the Church, and we meet it also in connection with the sacraments." (65) Congar's dialectic of structure and life has also been the subject of much discussion, (66) as have several other dialectical pairs.