theanthropism


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the·an·thro·pism

 (thē-ăn′thrə-pĭz′əm)
n.
1. Attribution of human traits to God; anthropomorphism.
2. Christianity The doctrine of the union of human and divine natures in Jesus.

the·an′thro·pist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

theanthropism

(θiːˈænθrəˌpɪzəm)
n
1. (Other Non-Christian Religions) the ascription of human traits or characteristics to a god or gods
2. (Theology) Christian theol the doctrine of the hypostatic union of the divine and human natures in the single person of Christ
[C19: from Ecclesiastical Greek theanthrōpos (from theos god + anthrōpos man) + -ism]
ˌtheanˈthropic adj
theˈanthropist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

theanthropism

1. the attributing of human characteristics to God; anthropomorphism.
2. a belief in the divinity of a human being.
3. a belief in God’s becoming man. Also called theanthroposophy.theanthropist, n.
See also: God and Gods
the condition of being, simultaneously, both god and man. Also theanthropology. — theanthropist, n. — theanthropic, adj.
See also: Christ
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theanthropism - (theology) the doctrine that Jesus was a union of the human and the divine
theology, divinity - the rational and systematic study of religion and its influences and of the nature of religious truth
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
2.theanthropism - the representation of objects (especially a god) as having human form or traitstheanthropism - the representation of objects (especially a god) as having human form or traits
representational process - any basic cognitive process in which some entity comes to stand for or represent something else
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
If we compare the derivatives cosmotheism, myriotheism, Moravianism, Plotinism, Psilanthropism and theanthropism coined by Coleridge to Walpole's creations balloonism and gardenist, it is obvious that the latter lack the academic flavour of the former and thus adopt a humorous connotation.