theatricalism


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the·at·ri·cal·ism

 (thē-ăt′rĭ-kə-lĭz′əm)
n.
Theatrical manner or style; showiness.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

theatricalism

(θɪˈætrɪkəlˌɪzəm)
n
behaviour or action that is theatrical or showy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

theatricalism

a tendency to actions marked by exaggerations in speech or behavior. Also called theatricism.
See also: Behavior
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:

theatricalism

noun
Showy mannerisms and behavior:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Her dances oppose the rejection of all artifice (associated with the Judson Church aesthetic) with a theatricalism that nonetheless retains high-art bona fides poised on the border between dance and gallery-worthy visual art.
Empowering them to become leaders in the arts by developing their creativity, theatricalism, self-esteem, respect, mind and body, and their role as artists.
In this regard, Bloom seems to qualify Hamlet's playful carefree attitude in both his books, observing that there is a "savage triumphalism" (53) in Hamlet's nature; and in support of his view that "there are no traces of Oedipus in Hamlet," he notes that the Hamlet Complex should be spoken of as "a murderous theatricalism." (54) But can one be playful and murderous?
Could such theatricalism be consistent with a core value of interior truthfulness, at the far reach of maneuver and invention?
6B3v) More generally, the Puritans reject theaters and theatricalism for their changeability and hypocrisy.
Many years ago it was considered sacrilegious to associate sacred religious rituals with secular performance forms (theatricalism).
This reading is extended to the theatricalism of "Lady Lazarus," which brilliantly clinches the general argument of the book.
136), especially with the independent theatre movement as they were transformed into Sturmbuhne, Galleria Sprovieri, Cabaret Voltaire, or the Bauhaus stage workshop and aestheticism was overcome through theatricalism that eventually liberated itself from dramatic poetry.
with the divine will," Lim observes that "There is such a thing as divinely-sanctioned theatricalism, a performance enacted by God's saint for the divine gaze" (153).
They early learned the value of co-opting elements of popular religiosity in evangelism, and of using inducements such as music, plays or theatricalism to entice people to church, (18) where their sympathetic awareness of human moral frailty ensured the sacraments were widely available.