theatricals


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the·at·ri·cal

 (thē-ăt′rĭ-kəl) also the·at·ric (-rĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or suitable for dramatic performance or the theater.
2. Marked by exaggerated self-display and unnatural behavior; affectedly dramatic.
3. Of or relating to a film that is being shown in movie theaters: The blockbuster's theatrical revenue was much higher than anticipated.
n.
1. A stage performance, especially by amateurs.
2. theatricals Affectedly dramatic gestures or behavior; histrionics.

the·at′ri·cal′i·ty (-kăl′ĭ-tē), the·at′ri·cal·ness (-kəl-nĭs) n.
the·at′ri·cal·ly adv.

theatricals

(θɪˈætrɪkəlz)
pl n
(Theatre) dramatic performances and entertainments, esp as given by amateurs
Translations
تَمثيلِيّات يَقوم بها الهُواة عادةً
divadlo
dramateater
műkedvelő színjátszás
leiksÿningar
sahne temsilleri

theatre

(ˈθiətə) (American) theater noun
1. a place where plays, operas etc are publicly performed.
2. plays in general; any theatre. Are you going to the theatre tonight?
3. (also ˈoperating-theatre) a room in a hospital where surgical operations are performed. Take the patient to the theatre; (also adjective) a theatre nurse.
theˈatrical (-ˈӕ-) adjective
1. of theatres or acting. a theatrical performance/career.
2. (behaving) as if in a play; over-dramatic. theatrical behaviour.
theˈatrically adverb
theˌatriˈcality (θiatriˈkӕ-) noun
theˈatricals (-ˈӕ-) noun plural
dramatic performances. He's very interested in amateur theatricals.
the theatre
1. the profession of actors. He's in the theatre.
2. drama. His special interest is the theatre.
References in classic literature ?
Theatricals, hunting, and heaven knows what besides!
In a general light, private theatricals are open to some objections, but as we are circumstanced, I must think it would be highly injudicious, and more than injudicious to attempt anything of the kind.
He was always ready for any mischief, and took delight in getting up theatricals.
"Private Theatricals!!!" cried Magdalen, her clear young voice ringing through the conservatory like a bell; her loose sleeves falling back and showing her round white arms to the dimpled elbows, as she clapped her hands ecstatically in the air.
For this new edition adds to the original merits of the work the very substantial charm of abundant illustrations, first-rate in subject and execution, and of three kinds--copper-plate likenesses of actors and other personages connected with theatrical history; a series of delicate, picturesque, highly detailed woodcuts of theatrical topography, chiefly the little old theatres; and, by way of tail-pieces to the chapters, a second series of woodcuts of a vigour and reality of information, within very limited compass, which make one think of Callot and the German [76] "little masters," depicting Garrick and other famous actors in their favourite scenes.
At the upper end of the room, were a couple of boys, one of them very tall and the other very short, both dressed as sailors--or at least as theatrical sailors, with belts, buckles, pigtails, and pistols complete--fighting what is called in play-bills a terrific combat, with two of those short broad-swords with basket hilts which are commonly used at our minor theatres.
"Do you have many theatrical people rooming here?" asked the young man.
Pondering over a new form of theatrical attraction for the coming winter season, Francis had determined to revive the languid public taste for the ballet by means of an entertainment of his own invention, combining dramatic interest with dancing.
And not only the poets, but the masters of these poets, the managers of playhouses, seem to be in this secret; for, besides the aforesaid kettle-drums, &c., which denote the heroe's approach, he is generally ushered on the stage by a large troop of half a dozen scene-shifters; and how necessary these are imagined to his appearance, may be concluded from the following theatrical story:--
Vane glanced at her, and with one of those false theatrical gestures that so often become a mode of second nature to a stage-player, clasped her in her arms.
Philander and Gustavus, after having raised their reputation by their Performances in the Theatrical Line at Edinburgh, removed to Covent Garden, where they still exhibit under the assumed names of LUVIS and QUICK.
After the brilliant failure of his first theatrical venture, he dared not return to the lodging which he occupied in the Rue Grenier-sur-l'Eau, opposite to the Port-au-Foin, having depended upon receiving from monsieur the provost for his epithalamium, the wherewithal to pay Master Guillaume Doulx-Sire, farmer of the taxes on cloven-footed animals in Paris, the rent which he owed him, that is to say, twelve sols parisian; twelve times the value of all that he possessed in the world, including his trunk-hose, his shirt, and his cap.