theft


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

theft

 (thĕft)
n.
1.
a. The unlawful taking of the property of another; larceny: the prevention of theft.
b. An instance of such taking: several car thefts.
2. Obsolete Something stolen.

[Middle English, from Old English thīefth.]

theft

(θɛft)
n
1. (Law) criminal law the dishonest taking of property belonging to another person with the intention of depriving the owner permanently of its possession
2. rare something stolen
[Old English thēofth; related to Old Norse thӯfth, Old Frisian thiūvethe, Middle Dutch düfte; see thief]
ˈtheftless adj

theft

(θɛft)

n.
1. the act of stealing; larceny.
2. an instance of this.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English thēfth, thēofth; see thief, -th1]

Theft

See also crime.

the stealing of whole herds of cattle, as contrasted with a few head. — abactor, n.
unlawful removal of goods from where they are deposited or stored.
the practice of being a bandit.
1. a kleptomania specializing in books.
2. the motivations of a biblioklept. — bibliokleptomaniac, n.
the practice of pillage, often destructive, usually practiced by a band of robbers. Also brigandage.brigand, n.brigandish, adj.
murder and robbery committed by dacoits, a class of criminals in India and Burma.
a despoiling; an act of robbery on a large scale; pillage.
Obsolete, pillage; the act of plundering.
the misappropriation of funds that have been entrusted to one for care or management. Also called peculation. — embezzler, n.
Obsolete, the act of stripping of possessions wrongfully and by force; spoliation or robbery.
an abnormal fear of robbers.
Psychology. an irresistible impulse to steal, especially when the thief can afford to pay. — kleptomaniac, n.
an abnormal fear of thieves or of loss through thievery.
1. SW. U.S. an act of thievery.
2. Scots Dialect, blackguardism and roguery. — ladrone, ladron, n.
embezzlement. — peculator, n.
1. petty stealing or pilfering.
2. the articles stolen in pilfering.
1. the act of plundering or large scale robbery, usually accompanied by violence as in wartime.
2. plundered property; booty.
the act of robbery on the high seas. See also ships. — pirate, n.piratic, piratical, adj.
1. the verbatim copying or imitation of the language, ideas, or thoughts of another author and representing them as one’s own original work.
2. the material so appropriated. Also plagiary.plagiarist, n.plagiaristic, adj.
the act or process of pillaging or plundering.
the state or quality of being excessively greedy or given to theft. — rapacious, adj.
the act of pillage or plundering.
the process of robbing or plundering, especially in time of war and on a large scale. See also church; ships.
1. the act or practice of stealing or thieving.
2. Rare. the property stolen.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theft - the act of taking something from someone unlawfullytheft - the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International"
breach of trust with fraudulent intent - larceny after trust rather than after unlawful taking
felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
embezzlement, misappropriation, peculation, misapplication, defalcation - the fraudulent appropriation of funds or property entrusted to your care but actually owned by someone else
pilferage - the act of stealing small amounts or small articles
shoplifting, shrinkage - the act of stealing goods that are on display in a store; "shrinkage is the retail trade's euphemism for shoplifting"
robbery - larceny by threat of violence
biopiracy - biological theft; illegal collection of indigenous plants by corporations who patent them for their own use
grand larceny, grand theft - larceny of property having a value greater than some amount (the amount varies by locale)
petit larceny, petty, petty larceny - larceny of property having a value less than some amount (the amount varies by locale)
skimming - failure to declare income in order to avoid paying taxes on it
rustling - the stealing of cattle

theft

noun stealing, robbery, thieving, fraud, rip-off (slang), swindling, embezzlement, pilfering, larceny, purloining, thievery Art theft is now part of organized crime.

theft

noun
The crime of taking someone else's property without consent:
Slang: rip-off.
Translations
سَرِقَةلُصوصِيَّه، سَرِقَه
krádež
tyveri
varkaus
krađa
lopás
òjófnaîur
盗み
도둑질
vagystė
zādzība
krádež
kraja
stöld
การขโมย
sự ăn trộm

theft

[θeft] N (gen) → robo m

theft

[ˈθɛft] n (= crime) → vol m (larcin)

theft

nDiebstahl m

theft

[θɛft] nfurto

theft

(θeft) noun
(an act of) stealing. He was jailed for theft.

theft

سَرِقَة krádež tyveri Diebstahl κλοπή robo varkaus vol krađa furto 盗み 도둑질 diefstal tyveri kradzież roubo кража stöld การขโมย hırsızlık sự ăn trộm 盗窃
References in classic literature ?
Or, by some genius of memory, to recall the fact that it was on this morning young Spear was to be sentenced for theft.
For a moment all were touched, and there was disposi- tion to deal mercifully with her, seeing that she was so young and friendless, and her case so piteous, and the law that robbed her of her support to blame as being the first and only cause of her transgression; but the prosecuting officer replied that whereas these things were all true, and most pitiful as well, still there was much small theft in these days, and mistimed mercy here would be a danger to property -- oh, my God, is there no property in ruined homes, and orphaned babes, and broken hearts that British law holds precious
Theft he could not abide, and plainly there was a thief in his house.
Breaking into the principal" was, in the minds of most thrifty New England women, a sin only second to arson, theft, or murder; and, though the rule was occasionally carried too far for common sense,--as in this case, where two elderly women of sixty might reasonably have drawn something from their little hoard in time of special need,--it doubtless wrought more of good than evil in the community.
We see the thief preaching against theft, and the adulterer against adultery.
That the hair was her own, she instantaneously felt as well satisfied as Marianne; the only difference in their conclusions was, that what Marianne considered as a free gift from her sister, Elinor was conscious must have been procured by some theft or contrivance unknown to herself.
I shall hear, I guess, that my property has been swept off to save from starving the hungry banditti, whom they cannot support but by theft and robbery.
They look upon fraud as a greater crime than theft, and therefore seldom fail to punish it with death; for they allege, that care and vigilance, with a very common understanding, may preserve a man's goods from thieves, but honesty has no defence against superior cunning; and, since it is necessary that there should be a perpetual intercourse of buying and selling, and dealing upon credit, where fraud is permitted and connived at, or has no law to punish it, the honest dealer is always undone, and the knave gets the advantage.
I favoured you with my love, and you repaid me with treachery and theft.
I found it too," said the goatherd, "but I would not lift it nor go near it for fear of some ill-luck or being charged with theft, for the devil is crafty, and things rise up under one's feet to make one fall without knowing why or wherefore.
The same man, stimulated by private pique against the MEGARENSIANS,[2] another nation of Greece, or to avoid a prosecution with which he was threatened as an accomplice of a supposed theft of the statuary Phidias,[3] or to get rid of the accusations prepared to be brought against him for dissipating the funds of the state in the purchase of popularity,[4] or from a combination of all these causes, was the primitive author of that famous and fatal war, distinguished in the Grecian annals by the name of the PELOPONNESIAN war; which, after various vicissitudes, intermissions, and renewals, terminated in the ruin of the Athenian commonwealth.
Cold, light, and selfish in the last resort, he had that modicum of prudence, miscalled morality, which keeps a man from inconvenient drunkenness or punishable theft.