theft

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theft

the act of stealing; unlawfully taking and carrying away the property of another; larceny
Not to be confused with:
burglary – breaking and entering a building with intent to steal
robbery – taking the property of a person in his or her presence by violence or intimidation
plunder – to rob by open force, as in war; to take wrongfully as by pillage or fraud
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

theft

 (thĕft)
n.
1.
a. The unlawful taking of the property of another; larceny: the prevention of theft.
b. An instance of such taking: several car thefts.
2. Obsolete Something stolen.

[Middle English, from Old English thīefth.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

theft

(θɛft)
n
1. (Law) criminal law the dishonest taking of property belonging to another person with the intention of depriving the owner permanently of its possession
2. rare something stolen
[Old English thēofth; related to Old Norse thӯfth, Old Frisian thiūvethe, Middle Dutch düfte; see thief]
ˈtheftless adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

theft

(θɛft)

n.
1. the act of stealing; larceny.
2. an instance of this.
[before 900; Middle English; Old English thēfth, thēofth; see thief, -th1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

Theft

See also crime.

the stealing of whole herds of cattle, as contrasted with a few head. — abactor, n.
unlawful removal of goods from where they are deposited or stored.
the practice of being a bandit.
1. a kleptomania specializing in books.
2. the motivations of a biblioklept. — bibliokleptomaniac, n.
the practice of pillage, often destructive, usually practiced by a band of robbers. Also brigandage.brigand, n.brigandish, adj.
murder and robbery committed by dacoits, a class of criminals in India and Burma.
a despoiling; an act of robbery on a large scale; pillage.
Obsolete, pillage; the act of plundering.
the misappropriation of funds that have been entrusted to one for care or management. Also called peculation. — embezzler, n.
Obsolete, the act of stripping of possessions wrongfully and by force; spoliation or robbery.
an abnormal fear of robbers.
Psychology. an irresistible impulse to steal, especially when the thief can afford to pay. — kleptomaniac, n.
an abnormal fear of thieves or of loss through thievery.
1. SW. U.S. an act of thievery.
2. Scots Dialect, blackguardism and roguery. — ladrone, ladron, n.
embezzlement. — peculator, n.
1. petty stealing or pilfering.
2. the articles stolen in pilfering.
1. the act of plundering or large scale robbery, usually accompanied by violence as in wartime.
2. plundered property; booty.
the act of robbery on the high seas. See also ships. — pirate, n.piratic, piratical, adj.
1. the verbatim copying or imitation of the language, ideas, or thoughts of another author and representing them as one’s own original work.
2. the material so appropriated. Also plagiary.plagiarist, n.plagiaristic, adj.
the act or process of pillaging or plundering.
the state or quality of being excessively greedy or given to theft. — rapacious, adj.
the act of pillage or plundering.
the process of robbing or plundering, especially in time of war and on a large scale. See also church; ships.
1. the act or practice of stealing or thieving.
2. Rare. the property stolen.
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theft - the act of taking something from someone unlawfullytheft - the act of taking something from someone unlawfully; "the thieving is awful at Kennedy International"
breach of trust with fraudulent intent - larceny after trust rather than after unlawful taking
felony - a serious crime (such as murder or arson)
embezzlement, misappropriation, peculation, misapplication, defalcation - the fraudulent appropriation of funds or property entrusted to your care but actually owned by someone else
pilferage - the act of stealing small amounts or small articles
shoplifting, shrinkage - the act of stealing goods that are on display in a store; "shrinkage is the retail trade's euphemism for shoplifting"
robbery - larceny by threat of violence
biopiracy - biological theft; illegal collection of indigenous plants by corporations who patent them for their own use
grand larceny, grand theft - larceny of property having a value greater than some amount (the amount varies by locale)
petit larceny, petty, petty larceny - larceny of property having a value less than some amount (the amount varies by locale)
skimming - failure to declare income in order to avoid paying taxes on it
rustling - the stealing of cattle
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

theft

noun stealing, robbery, thieving, fraud, rip-off (slang), swindling, embezzlement, pilfering, larceny, purloining, thievery Art theft is now part of organized crime.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

theft

noun
The crime of taking someone else's property without consent:
Slang: rip-off.
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
سَرِقَةلُصوصِيَّه، سَرِقَه
krádež
tyveri
varkaus
krađa
lopás
òjófnaîur
盗み
도둑질
vagystė
zādzība
krádež
kraja
stöld
การขโมย
sự ăn trộm

theft

[θeft] N (gen) → robo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

theft

[ˈθɛft] n (= crime) → vol m (larcin)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

theft

nDiebstahl m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

theft

[θɛft] nfurto
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

theft

(θeft) noun
(an act of) stealing. He was jailed for theft.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

theft

سَرِقَة krádež tyveri Diebstahl κλοπή robo varkaus vol krađa furto 盗み 도둑질 diefstal tyveri kradzież roubo кража stöld การขโมย hırsızlık sự ăn trộm 盗窃
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
Collins Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
"I'm a likely one to hide thefts! Why if I wanted to deal in them, opportunities came ready enough to me in my government."
This would have made the theft much more difficult than Mynheer Isaac had at first expected.
A WOLF accused a Fox of theft, but the Fox entirely denied the charge.
He was excellent above all men in theft and perjury.
"And I answer," retorted the impenetrable lawyer, "that the suspicion of theft rests on your Ladyship's adopted daughter, and on nobody else."
For gif adultery, sacrilege, oppression, barbarous cruelty, and theft heaped upon theft, deserve hell, the great King of Carrick can no more escape hell for ever, than the imprudent Abbot escaped the fire for a season as follows.
His work included the adjudgment of the arms of Achilles to Odysseus, the madness of Aias, the bringing of Philoctetes from Lemnos and his cure, the coming to the war of Neoptolemus who slays Eurypylus, son of Telephus, the making of the wooden horse, the spying of Odysseus and his theft, along with Diomedes, of the Palladium: the analysis concludes with the admission of the wooden horse into Troy by the Trojans.
Or is there a pleasure in being accessory to a theft when we cannot commit it ourselves?
The theft of the Flibberty-Gibbet was merely amusing, though the means by which the theft had been effected gave him hurt.
The theft raid which he had made upon the village turned out better than he had ventured to hope.
"Breaking into the principal" was, in the minds of most thrifty New England women, a sin only second to arson, theft, or murder; and, though the rule was occasionally carried too far for common sense,--as in this case, where two elderly women of sixty might reasonably have drawn something from their little hoard in time of special need,--it doubtless wrought more of good than evil in the community.
We see the thief preaching against theft, and the adulterer against adultery.