theism


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the·ism

 (thē′ĭz′əm)
n.
Belief in the existence of a god or gods, especially belief in a personal God as creator and ruler of the world.

the′ist n.
the·is′tic, the·is′ti·cal adj.
the·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

theism

(ˈθiːɪzəm)
n
1. (Theology) the form of the belief in one God as the transcendent creator and ruler of the universe that does not necessarily entail further belief in divine revelation. Compare deism
2. (Theology) the belief in the existence of a God or gods. Compare atheism
[C17: from Greek theos god + -ism]

the•ism

(ˈθi ɪz əm)

n.
1. belief in one God as the creator and ruler of the universe, without rejection of revelation (disting. from deism).
2. belief in the existence of a god or gods (opposed to atheism).
[1670–80; < Greek the(ós) god + -ism]
the′ist, n., adj.
the•is′tic, the•is′ti•cal, adj.

theism

1. a belief in the existence of God or gods.
2. a belief in one god as creator and ruler of the universe, without rejection of special revelation. Cf. deism.theism, n.
See also: God and Gods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theism - the doctrine or belief in the existence of a God or gods
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
monotheism - belief in a single God
polytheism - belief in multiple Gods
pantheism - the doctrine or belief that God is the universe and its phenomena (taken or conceived of as a whole) or the doctrine that regards the universe as a manifestation of God
pantheism - (rare) worship that admits or tolerates all gods
atheism, godlessness - the doctrine or belief that there is no God
Translations

theism

[ˈθiːɪzəm] Nteísmo m

theism

nTheismus m

theism

[ˈθiːɪzəm] nteismo
References in classic literature ?
Therefore theism did never perturb states; for it makes men wary of themselves, as looking no further: and we see the times inclined to atheism (as the time of Augustus Caesar) were civil times.
In the multiplex theism of certain Christian churches,
But where it departs from the Calvinistic Christianity and exhibits him as the defier of Jove, it represents a state of mind which readily appears wherever the doctrine of Theism is taught in a crude, objective form, and which seems the self-defence of man against this untruth, namely a discontent with the believed fact that a God exists, and a feeling that the obligation of reverence is onerous.
It is Piper's contention that "the failure of many Christian leaders to see the magnitude of error in open theism has left churches and denominations and schools with no clear boundary between what is tolerably Christian and what is not" (p.
He is primarily concerned with discussing the God of classical theism, and does not give much attention to deism, fideism, pantheism, or other vague or problematic ideas about supreme beings.
But they need a robust theism to survive, one that supports the traditional idea of God as personal, purposive, providential creator, supreme in power, perfect in goodness, and experienced by human beings.
Thus diluted, Kant's practical evocation of God perfectly matches Byrne's agnosticism, never content to deny God's existence (or to reduce God to an internal sentiment) but never content to affirm the personal God of traditional theism.
In his presentation of theism, Plantinga assumes that an omnipotent deity can't be detected by science and is therefore a part of the "evidence base" of theism.
He covers classical theism and contemporary responses to it, making room for the Holy Spirit, the passion of the Holy Spirit and divine impassibility, the presence of the Holy Spirit and divine immutability, and the power of the Holy Spirit and divine omnipotence.
Hence, Spinozism and (traditional) theism are obviously irreconcilable.
In this book Nagasawa critiques knowledge arguments against traditional theism and physicalism.
By pansacramental naturalism, Knight attempts to get beyond both the deism characteristic of much of modern theology and the interventionist theism that marks much of contemporary reaction to deistic notions of science and its relationship to religion.