theism


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the·ism

 (thē′ĭz′əm)
n.
Belief in the existence of a god or gods, especially belief in a personal God as creator and ruler of the world.

the′ist n.
the·is′tic, the·is′ti·cal adj.
the·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

theism

(ˈθiːɪzəm)
n
1. (Theology) the form of the belief in one God as the transcendent creator and ruler of the universe that does not necessarily entail further belief in divine revelation. Compare deism
2. (Theology) the belief in the existence of a God or gods. Compare atheism
[C17: from Greek theos god + -ism]

the•ism

(ˈθi ɪz əm)

n.
1. belief in one God as the creator and ruler of the universe, without rejection of revelation (disting. from deism).
2. belief in the existence of a god or gods (opposed to atheism).
[1670–80; < Greek the(ós) god + -ism]
the′ist, n., adj.
the•is′tic, the•is′ti•cal, adj.

theism

1. a belief in the existence of God or gods.
2. a belief in one god as creator and ruler of the universe, without rejection of special revelation. Cf. deism.theism, n.
See also: God and Gods
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theism - the doctrine or belief in the existence of a God or gods
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
monotheism - belief in a single God
polytheism - belief in multiple Gods
pantheism - the doctrine or belief that God is the universe and its phenomena (taken or conceived of as a whole) or the doctrine that regards the universe as a manifestation of God
pantheism - (rare) worship that admits or tolerates all gods
atheism, godlessness - the doctrine or belief that there is no God
Translations

theism

[ˈθiːɪzəm] Nteísmo m

theism

nTheismus m

theism

[ˈθiːɪzəm] nteismo
References in classic literature ?
Therefore theism did never perturb states; for it makes men wary of themselves, as looking no further: and we see the times inclined to atheism (as the time of Augustus Caesar) were civil times.
In the multiplex theism of certain Christian churches, three entirely distinct deities consistent with only one.
But where it departs from the Calvinistic Christianity and exhibits him as the defier of Jove, it represents a state of mind which readily appears wherever the doctrine of Theism is taught in a crude, objective form, and which seems the self-defence of man against this untruth, namely a discontent with the believed fact that a God exists, and a feeling that the obligation of reverence is onerous.
This clearly written book offers the finest personal exposition of the school of naturalist theism that dominates the writings of many contemporary intellectuals and scientists.
I continue to value and learn from the many modern debates on God -- theism, atheism, pantheism, panentheism -- but these modern "isms" of theological argument and persuasion no longer provide for me the best way to approach the question of God.
In The Vanquished Gods, author Richard Schiagel takes a fresh approach to philosophy of religion, departing from the way the latter is practiced in Anglo-American philosophy In contrast to the analytically oriented approach favored by critics and defenders of theism alike, his is, in the main, a historical one.
In particular, especially in Jesuit universities, the philosophy of Joseph Marechal, S.J., often called "Transcendental Thomism," though it claims to be a theism, has replaced authentic Thomism; Marechal's philosophy is much more indebted to Immanuel Kant (d.
He defends a version of dualism about persons (which he calls "integrative dualism") along with an understanding of God's relation to the world ("integrative theism") wherein God is not identical with the cosmos but is affectively present in it.
Her strategy is to develop a cumulative case for theism, in which religious experiences play a key role.
God, Existence, and Fictional Objects: The Case for Meinongian Theism
Belief in theism is espoused by as much as 80 percent of the United States and includes strong activists for sustainable policies, including some who passionately proselytize using the argument that only theism can save us from our apathy in the face of global warming.
Darwin was aware of such questions but failed to see their evidential significance for theism. This paper explores this significance.