thematization

thematization

(ˌθiːmətaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

thematisation

n
(Linguistics) linguistics the mental act or process of selecting particular topics as themes in discourse or words as themes in sentences
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Interrogative sentences are very often substructured to reflect thematization. The theme, whether subject or object, is preposed to the interrogative clause and assigned a bell-shaped contour setting it apart from the rest of the sentence.
To engage the student in this process of conscientization, Freire elaborated a literacy method consisting of three stages: investigation, in which the teacher gets to know the local community and discovers its "vocabulary universe" of important words and generative themes; thematization, which explores and contextualizes these generative themes, breaking words down into phonetic groups for reading and writing; and problematization, which re-presents the themes as a political problem that demands collective action.
For example, Duchan and Palermo (1982) conceptualized autism as a thematization disorder.
Consistent with Van Manen's (1990) recommendations, analysis of their responses-the thematization process-was conducted in stages.
"During this era the genre is replete with images, allusions, character clues, motifs, themes, narrative paradigms, and other formalist features that derive from the novelists interfacing biblical (Adamic myth) and anthropological (totemic) models of society." Focusing on relevant sections of four novels, he makes an elaborately detailed case for the thematization of miscegenation, sexuality, violence, and the lynching ritual as a black counterdiscourse to white Negrophobic discourse that blacks are primitive savages and whites are civilized human beings.
(1968) and Kindheitsmuster (1976), stem from what Finney calls "epistemological skepticism, or thematization of the difficulty of knowing," and include the narrator's constant questioning of the possibility of objectivity, frequent changes in perspective, indeed uncertainty concerning identity.
Husserl characterizes phenomenology as a thematization of the ego, a science of subjectivity, a form of idealism.
It is, first of all, "irreducible to consciousness and thematization." [11] The ethical relation, which Levinas also designated by such names as "proximity," "for-the-other," "responsibility," "substitution," and "expiation," is the infinite responsibility, from time immemorial, taken up in relation to the face of the other who commands me from the height of his or her simultaneous transcendence and destitution:
Rhetors not only provide an audience with a message they want to hear or with unique policy options that the audience may not have thought of themselves, but often their discourse conditions the possibilities of identities, thematization of needs, and the configuration of a social world.
The thematization of selfhood remains a task barely under way among contemporary social theorists because the conditions of selfhood, character formation, and identity construction are all drastically transformed under the conditions of globality.
On the basis of such a very lightly sketched notion of a developed narrative literature, involving as it does the thematization of its literary nature, genre, and intertextuality, I think we have more than enough to embarrass the advocate of even the most modest perversity.
Finally, Brian Shaw detects a thematization of the references to words and speech in Andreas, but fails to reckon adequately with the lack of a proximate source.