theological virtue


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Related to theological virtue: cardinal virtue

theolog′ical vir′tue


n.
any of the three graces, faith, hope, or charity, infused into the soul by a special grace of God.
[1520–30]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.theological virtue - according to Christian ethics: one of the three virtues (faith, hope, and charity) created by God to round out the natural virtues
brotherly love, charity - a kindly and lenient attitude toward people
cardinal virtue - one of the seven preeminent virtues
hope - one of the three Christian virtues
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Sokolowski, a philosophy professor at Catholic University of America, comments that "the theological virtue of hope is directed to our salvation and the beatific vision, to our life with God.
Christian charity exceeds our natural capacity for love: It is a theological virtue.
Aquinas comes close to the distinction between goodness and rightness when analyzing the theological virtue of charity.
The perceived contradiction between truth and love that troubles sinful man is an illusion, which is overcome by the perfection of the first theological virtue, faith-rightly understood as the Catholic faith.
The theological virtue of hope (as opposed to the passion of hope) is infused and theo-logical (deriving from God and working through the embodied rational nature that is the human).
No one explains growth in charity, which entails greater facility in acts of charity, by positing some acquired theological virtues parallel to the infused theological virtue charity.
Claiming particular significance for the theological virtue of hope must mean that it is more than simply faith voiced in an eschatological key, for example; if the claim of particularity has any meaning, hope must have a distinct nature.
More generally, what does the Christian understanding of the theological virtue of hope bring to the Church's self-understanding today?
Hope is the theological virtue that most closely embodies what Jesus told Peter--and us--to cultivate as we, the church, move out in space and time from our origins in Jerusalem.
Through this habit of prayer comes a disposition that relies upon God's help and finds the mean between presumption and despair--a disposition otherwise known as the theological virtue of hope.
In theological terms, patience, as described in the poem, is an expression of either the cardinal virtue of temperance or the theological virtue of hope, and even if the latter be more appropriate in Jonah's case, hope has enough to do with temperance that it might be said to encompass temperance.
Among his topics are interpreting the middle ages, the prophetic voice of von Hayek, Benedict on the nature of scientific enquiry, the Catholic philosopher and the Catholic university in North America, the impact of Vatican II, and the natural basis of the theological virtue of hope.