theologism

Related to theologism: theologist, theology, positivism

theologism

1. any theological speculation.
2. the assumption that other disciplines, as philosophy or science, are inferior to theology.
See also: Theology
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Regardless of the completeness of Tolkien's myth-making (and as illustrated repeatedly in the present discussion) its theologism is not entirely disassociated from the intertextual influences of Tolkien's Catholic faith nor from his philological profession.
Among her specific topics are the influence of Zoroastrianism on various worldviews, stewardship, divine determination and human free will, supernatural theologism, the duality and triadic problem, evil and suffering and a wholesome multidimensional worldview, faith counseling and the four grand acts, and ministry as social and cultural response.
The call that issues from the Cross threatens what Derrida calls the "unavowed theologism" of the political concept of sovereignty by returning us to its root, to its understanding of God, to its underlying or archi-theology.
But one can see at once that this is a theologism. For Christian piety it is meaningless." (56)
The central question of this book, then, is a complex one: Is there an alternative to identity politics and Marxist theory that can define a materialist epistemology--one that would recognize the possibility of objectivity in the face of multicultural realities and thus avoid both the imperialist universalism of positivism and theologism and the impotent constructivism of postmodernism?
That is because any theism will lead to the institutionalisation of theological doctrine through social structures characterised by privilege and oppression: i.e., it leads to rule by a priestly hierarchy, a system for which Bakunin invented 'theologism' as a denotation.
Acknowledging her tenuous role as a woman poet who speaks publicly about such weighty matters as religion and poetry, Barrett explains her approach in an 1839 letter to Mary Russell Mitford: I have been taught to "walk softly" upon all subjects connected with theologisms [sic] by the repeated intimations of my obstinate proclivity towards them.
Yet for Barrett, "theologisms"--by which she seems to mean the poetic treatment of theological topics rather than the "science" of theology--are most "approachable" by poets because they tend toward "high thoughts" and "doctrinal mysteries." They are precisely the topics poets--even women poets--should address, if such poets seek "greatness" in art.