theonomy


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theonomy

(θɪˈɒnəmɪ)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the state of being governed by God
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In his 1919 lecture "Uber die Idee einer Theologie der Kultur," (17) Paul Tillich argues a similar point by asserting that authentic religious experience is found amid the triadic interplay of content, form, and meaning (Gehalt), to which he links the terms autonomy, heteronomy, and theonomy.
15) With his autonomy/heteronomy dichotomy, Kant could not see a third possibility that Pope Saint John Paul II offers in Veritatis Splendor, which he called "participated theonomy.
In this sense, evil strives to emulate the God of Theonomy, the God of pure will, that in theologian John Feinberg's words is a God, who if it
As Choi has rightly pointed out, "The task of cultural theology is to reveal 'theonomy' in the culture of autonomy, identify the danger of theology of religions, which is relativism (secularization) of autonomy, and the danger of ecclesiastical theology, which is absolutism of theonomy, and aim for organic unity of theonomy and autonomy (Konvivenz).
Among the topics are Islam and Islamic natural law, the role of natural law and natural right in the search for a universal ethic, ecocide and Christian natural law, natural law as a source of inspiration, from a heart of stone to a heart of flesh: toward an epideictic rhetoric of natural law, the political common good: from the nation-state to a global perspective, natural law as a "work of reason:" understanding the metaphysics of participated theonomy, and pragmatic and christological foundations of natural law.
Their absolutism often results in downright theocratic aims, with Rushdoony chief amongst those advocating a turn toward theonomy in American law.
By choosing radical theonomy or radical autonomy over theonomy, humans sin and so are alienated from their authentic selves.
Theonomy liberates the human will from the potentially destructive relativism of its subjectivity; human autonomy protects the absoluteness of the law against the occasionally negative consequences of its time-alienated objectivity.
Bujo sums this up when he writes that "one can become like God only by acting freely, autonomously, and creatively; this does not in any way abolish the theonomy.
Christian Reconstructionism is also known as Dominionism or Theonomy and is characterized by the desire to bring all areas of life under the lordship of Christ.
So, properly understood, theonomy is not heteronomy, but the ground, the guarantee and also the limit of human autonomy, which may never deteriorate into human arbitrariness.
7) In this "participated theonomy," we are active cooperators with God in shaping our lives in accordance with His plan.