theophoric


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theophoric

(ˌθɪəˈfɒrɪk)
adj
(Theology) having the name of a god embedded in something, such as a name
Translations
References in periodicals archive ?
As noted by Cross, "It is not coincidental that the language of theophany and the imagery of revelation derived from the mythology of the storm god largely fell out of use, beginning in the ninth century, and including the two centuries to follow, in prophetic Yahwism." (32) Furthermore, names with the Baal theophoric element, which were accepted in earlier Israelite religious tradition, were later changed by Hebrew scribes.
For we have clear attestation of Gad used as a self-standing theophoric in West Semitic proper names throughout the first millennium BCE: (3)
The theophoric name of the owner of the mask includes the name of the goddess Neith, the patron goddess of Dynasty 26.
Some considered that this name is either descriptive or theophoric. For the first situation the translation is: king of righteousness, and in the second case: My King is Righteous (Hamilton 1990, 408; Wenham, 2002, 316).
The god Resheph is mentioned in documents and appears as a theophoric element in personal names from the mid-third millennium until the end of the first century BCE.
In the pages that followed this wonderfully generative question, he explains that the Jewish poetic project is necessarily a "theophoric," or God-bearing, enterprise.
2890-2686 BCE, (11) in the name of the king Re'-Nb, "Re/Sun is my Lord," (12) or Nb-Re', or "Lord of Re/Sun." (13) By the fourth dynasty, 2613-2498 BCE, (14) one regularly finds kings bearing theophoric names incorporating Re's name, and by the fifth dynasty, beginning about 2497 BCE, on accession to the throne, kings regularly assumed a s3-Re name, the Son of Re name, (15) as the fifth name in their titulary.
Still priest of Emesa's god, whose realm included mountains and the sun, he assumed a theophoric name, Elagabalus (or Heliogabalus).
Following the first essay on ancestry, Chen turns to topics as diverse as the legend of Mulan and the linguistic origin of the Chinese unicorn, the relations between kin and the treatment of canines in various Sino-Altaic cultures, the connections between the Huns, the Bulgars, and the Steppe peoples bordering China, Iranian cultural connections, the use of theophoric names in China and their cultural ancestry, and the likely ancestry (both tribal and cultural) of the celebrated Tang dynasty poet Bai Juyi.
Becking hace notar que, a pesar de que hay documentos que atestiguan que la mayor parte de los israelitas siguieron dando a sus hijos nombres que contenian la referencia a Yahveh, sin embargo, parece que la asimilacion cultural y religiosa fue total: "In the Assyrian exile the former Israelites went on to give their children names with YHWH as a theophoric element.
They frequently failed to recognise theophoric morphemes such as [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] yahu and [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] 'el.
The absence of God is even recapitulated in the names of both Jewish actors, which are all but theophoric. "Esther" derives from the Persian stara ("star"), which resembles "Ishtar," the name of a goddess in the Akkadian pantheon; "Mordecai," the name of Esther's cousin, derives from "Marduk," the primary deity of Babylon.