theoretically


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the·o·ret·i·cal

 (thē′ə-rĕt′ĭ-kəl) also the·o·ret·ic (-rĕt′ĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or based on theory.
2. Restricted to theory; not practical or applied: theoretical physics.
3. Studying or working to develop theory.

[Late Latin theōrēticus, from Greek theōrētikos, from theōrētos, observable, from theōrein, to look at; see theorem.]

the′o·ret′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.theoretically - in theory; according to the assumed facts; "on paper the candidate seems promising"
2.theoretically - in a theoretical manner; "he worked the problem out theoretically"
by trial and error, empirically, through empirical observation - in an empirical manner; "this can be empirically tested"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
نَظَرِيّاً
teoreticky
fræîilega
teoreticky
kuramsal/teorik olarak

theoretically

[θɪəˈretɪkəlɪ] ADV (gen) → teóricamente, en teoría
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

theoretically

[ˌθiːəˈrɛtɪkəli] advthéoriquement
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

theoretically

advtheoretisch
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

theoretically

[θɪəˈrɛtɪklɪ] advin linea teorica
theoretically possible → teoricamente possibile
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

theory

(ˈθiəri) plural ˈtheories noun
1. an idea or explanation which has not yet been proved to be correct. There are many theories about the origin of life; In theory, I agree with you, but it would not work in practice.
2. the main principles and ideas in an art, science etc as opposed to the practice of actually doing it. A musician has to study both the theory and practice of music.
ˌtheoˈretical (-ˈreti-) adjective
ˌtheoˈretically (-ˈreti-)
adverb.
ˈtheorize, ˈtheorise verb
to make theories. He did not know what had happened, so he could only theorize about it.
ˈtheorist noun
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in classic literature ?
None of these sequences are theoretically invariable, since something may intervene to disturb them.
(2) Theoretically, there is no limit to the lift of a dirigible.
Theoretically, this doctrine is unquestionable; but it has practical drawbacks.
And he wanted to prove this theoretically in his book and practically on his land.
Although Oliver had been brought up by philosophers, he was not theoretically acquainted with the beautiful axiom that self-preservation is the first law of nature.
"Theoretically. Theoretically only, on foreign territory; abroad only by a fiction," said the Assistant Commissioner, alluding to the character of Embassies, which are supposed to be part and parcel of the country to which they belong.
Stuart, whose turn it was to deal, gathered them up, and went on: "You are right, theoretically, Mr.
Theoretically, the idea of divorce was almost as distasteful to him as to his mother; and he was annoyed that Mr.
Theoretically, she was already as good a blacksmith as I, or better.
The Communists, therefore, are on the one hand, practically, the most advanced and resolute section of the working-class parties of every country, that section which pushes forward all others; on the other hand, theoretically, they have over the great mass of the proletariat the advantage of clearly understanding the line of march, the conditions, and the ultimate general results of the proletarian movement.
I now knew that while theoretically a prisoner I was virtually free, and I hastened to regain the city limits before the defection of Woola could be discovered by his erstwhile masters.
Now, modern French novels are not to my taste, either practically or theoretically. Limited as had yet been my experience of life, I had once had the opportunity of contemplating, near at hand, an example of the results produced by a course of interesting and romantic domestic treachery.