therapeutic cloning


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therapeutic cloning

n.
The production of embryonic stem cells for use in replacing or repairing damaged tissues or organs, achieved by transferring a diploid nucleus from a body cell into an egg whose nucleus has been removed and by harvesting cells from the resulting blastocyst.

therapeutic cloning

n
1. (Medicine) the permitted creation of cloned human tissues for surgical transplant
2. (Genetics) the permitted creation of cloned human tissues for surgical transplant
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.therapeutic cloning - nuclear transplantation of a patient's own cells to make an oocyte from which immune-compatible cells (especially stem cells) can be derived for transplant
cloning - a general term for the research activity that creates a copy of some biological entity (a gene or organism or cell)
nuclear transplantation, SCNT, somatic cell nuclear transfer, somatic cell nuclear transplantation - moving a cell nucleus and its genetic material from one cell to another
References in periodicals archive ?
com/cloning-breakthrough-adult-stem-cells-perfectly-replicated-moving-science-toward-disease-specific) clone adult stem cells , a huge breakthrough for therapeutic cloning research.
But the therapeutic cloning technique they employed would also be the start of the process of making duplicate humans.
New research from the University of Nevada, Reno provides strong evidence that a majority of Americans favor ongoing research in all stem cell research, including the use of therapeutic cloning which is currently banned in the US.
Burt carefully avoided any mention of so-called therapeutic cloning or the fact that both therapeutic and reproductive cloning use the same techniquesomatic cell nuclear transfer or SCNT (which the National Institutes of Health has called "the scientific term for cloning")to produce a new human organism.
Prompted by an image of therapeutic cloning presented on a South Korean stamp, a brief review of stem cell research and the events of the Woo-suk Hwang scandal are discussed.
An Australian ban on the research, known as therapeutic cloning or somatic cell nuclear transfer, was lifted in December 2006 after a rare conscience vote in the national parliament.
The British government introduced legislation in order to allow licensed therapeutic cloning in a debate in January 2001 after an amendment to the Human Fertilization & Embryology Act 1990.
Ever since the birth of Dolly the sheep in 1997, this kind of therapeutic cloning has been a goal for medical research.
The Edinburgh University professor, said the new technique was "easier to accept socially" than therapeutic cloning.
The small margin of victory could be owing to deceptive ads placed by the measure's supporters, which claimed that the amendment bans "human cloning" The only difference between the two types of cloning is that in human cloning, the embryo is implanted in the uterus, and in therapeutic cloning, it is not.
If granted the HFEA licence will allow scientists to create hybrid embryos through a technique known as nuclear transfer, or therapeutic cloning.
The research, known as therapeutic cloning, is hailed as the next stage in stem cell development.