therapy dog


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Related to therapy dog: service dog

therapy dog

n.
A dog that has been specially trained to provide emotional assistance to people in hospitals, nursing homes, and other institutions.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Barrington's other whippet, a 15-month-old named Jackson, has recently passed his therapy dog certifications, and she plans to begin bringing him into the rotation in her volunteerism as soon as his certification card arrives.
Sedgwick has not previously hosted a therapy dog event, but the company has been encouraging clients to explore the options of embracing emotional support dogs in the workplace.
Therapy Dog visits are just one of a number of activities and therapies which take place on the Hergest Unit.
In 2016 alone, 160 Alliance therapy dog teams visited more than 275 partner sites, including hospitals, nursing homes, hospices and family courts, serving more than 50,000 Central Texans.
Councillor Lucy Hodgson, Worcestershire County Council's cabinet member for communities, said: "We are really excited to have Bella, a fully trained therapy dog in the library.
Katie explained: "We've got little Teddy here who is on hand as the therapy dog just in case anyone needs to calm there nerves a bit."
Written by Clea DuVall, Jennifer Crittenden, and Gabrielle Allan, 'Therapy Dog' revolves around a dog named Honey who runs group therapy sessions for other animals to manage neuroses brought on by their owners and each other.
"Buster has such a lovely nature and is an ideal therapy dog. He also accompanies people with low social skills, autism and agoraphobia.
They joined Therapy Dogs Nationwide after finding about the service from a fellow dog walking friend.
Visits to a children's hospital by therapy dogs have helped reduce anxiety among young patients awaiting medical tests, investigations and examinations, according to a new study.
Those donations supported the addition of volunteer therapy dog and handler teams to serve and benefit the well-being of seniors in care throughout the province.
On leashes, in baskets, atop shopping carts, even in baby strollers, canines have gone public under loosely regulated--and even more loosely enforced--labels of guide dogs, service dogs, support dogs and therapy dogs.