thereabout


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there·a·bouts

 (thâr′ə-bouts′) also there·a·bout (-bout′)
adv.
1. Near that place; about there: somewhere in Kansas or thereabouts.
2. About that number, amount, or time.

there•a•bout

(ˈðɛər əˌbaʊt, ˌðɛər əˈbaʊt)

also there′a•bouts`,



adv.
1. about or near that place or time: last June or thereabout.
2. about that number, amount, etc.: a dozen or thereabout.
[before 950]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.thereabout - near that time or date; "come at noon or thereabouts"
2.thereabout - near that place; "he stayed in London or thereabouts for several weeks"
Translations
نَحْو، حَوالي، تَقْريبا

there

(ðeə) , (ðə) adverb
1. (at, in, or to) that place. He lives there; Don't go there.
2. used to introduce sentences in which a state, fact etc is being announced. There has been an accident at the factory; There seems to be something wrong; I don't want there to be any mistakes in this.
3. at that time; at that point in a speech, argument etc. There I cannot agree with you; Don't stop there – tell me what happened next!
4. (with the subject of the sentence following the verb except when it is a pronoun) used at the beginning of a sentence, usually with be or go, to draw attention to, or point out, someone or something. There she goes now! There it is!
5. (placed immediately after noun) used for emphasis or to point out someone or something. That book there is the one you need.
interjection
1. used to calm or comfort. There, now. Things aren't as bad as they seem.
2. used when a person has been shown to be correct, when something bad happens, or when something has been completed. There! I told you he would do it!; There! That's that job done; There! I said you would hurt yourself!
ˌthereaˈbout(s) adverb
approximately in that place, of that number, at that time etc. a hundred or thereabouts; at three o'clock or thereabouts.
therefore (ˈðeəfoː) adverb
for that reason. He worked hard, and therefore he was able to save money.
there's (ðeəz) short for there is
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
The night was pretty dark, with neither moon nor stars visible, and as Brower had never dwelt thereabout, and knew nothing of the lay of the land, he was, naturally, not long in losing himself.
Pulling himself together, he ran obliquely away from the cliff to a point distant from its foot; thereabout he expected to find his man; and thereabout he naturally failed.
Keep a close watch on them therefore; and dispatch one of your comrades, the lightest of foot, to bring the news of the yeomen thereabout.''
At twelve or thereabout I put the literary calling to bed for a time, having gone to a school where cricket and football were more esteemed, but during the year before I went to the university, it woke up and I wrote great part of a three-volume novel.
He was to celebrate the marriage of an old knight--a returned Crusader--and a landed young woman; and all the gentry thereabout were to grace the occasion with their presence.
And not only did the Martians either not know of (which is incredible), or abstain from, the wheel, but in their apparatus singularly little use is made of the fixed pivot or relatively fixed pivot, with circular motions thereabout confined to one plane.
The Rue Richelieu and the Rue Villedot were then, owing to their vicinity to the ramparts, less frequented than any others in that direction, for the town was thinly inhabited thereabout.
But on the pillars Seraph eyes have seen The dimness of this world : that greyish green That Nature loves the best for Beauty's grave Lurk'd in each cornice, round each architrave - And every sculptur'd cherub thereabout That from his marble dwelling peeréd out Seem'd earthly in the shadow of his niche - Achaian statues in a world so rich ?
Once there (and it was always lurking thereabout), it is very active and nimble in Mrs.
On attaining the age of eight, or thereabout, children fly away from the Gardens, and never come back.
Coming to a dead stop in a little copse thereabout, she suffered her rider to dismount with right goodwill, and to tie her to the trunk of a tree.
However, I ventured that, for all that the people there or thereabout knew of me, was to my advantage; and all the character he had of me, after he had inquired, was that I was a woman of fortune, and that I was a very modest, sober body; which, whether true or not in the main, yet you may see how necessary it is for all women who expect anything in the world, to preserve the character of their virtue, even when perhaps they may have sacrificed the thing itself.