thereness


Also found in: Thesaurus.

thereness

(ˈðɛənəs)
n
(Philosophy) the quality of having existence or of being there
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thereness - real existence; "things are really there...capture the thereness of them"--Charles Hopkinson
presence - the state of being present; current existence; "he tested for the presence of radon"
2.thereness - the state of being there--not here--in position
presence - the state of being present; current existence; "he tested for the presence of radon"
hereness - the state of being here in this place
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
inside the atrium caught in the letter and toward me qua thereness
The inexplicable thereness of a Vija Celmins--rendered image or object is difficult to parse.
Francis Bacon, for instance, called wonder "broken knowledge." What gets lost in this reduction, though, is a deeper sense of wonder at the mystery of being, wonder at the sheer thereness of it all, at there being something rather than nothing.
Certainly, this final contribution to this volume demonstrates the life-affirming truth that "instilling love for our people" means a day-to-day religious thereness of mutual ties in family and community.
Three objectives will be met: (1) explore how people relate to different biodiversity attributes (particular morphologies, sounds, smells, textures, behaviours and/or cultural meanings associated with species), positively and negatively, across all classes of cultural ecosystem service and types of human-nature experience (intentional, incidental, indirect, thereness); (2) quantify variation in how people value, or not, different biodiversity attributes using a range of monetary and non-monetary valuation techniques, including new subjective wellbeing measures; (3) understand how co-occurrence between biodiversity and people may alter across space/time (both seasonal and inter-decadal), and the impact this may have on human-biodiversity relationships.
[f]or there is an "outside" to what is constructed by discourse, but this is not an absolute "outside," an ontological thereness that exceeds or counters the boundaries of discourse; as a constitutive "outside," it is that which can only be though-when it can-in relation to that discourse, at and as its most tenuous borders.
The accurate translation according to Heidegger, however, would be a set of significations comprising 'home stead', at-homeness, a standing in and by itself, a self enclosedness, an integral presentness or thereness (German; Anwesen).
surprise of poetry, its Tightness and thereness" (192).
Everywhere in the world there's what the painter Frank Auerbach says is 'the recalcitrant, inescapable thereness of everyday objects' so anywhere in the world can be fascinating.
"Thereness:" Implications of Heidegger's "presence" for Maori.
In a film, the narrator can partially control the verbal track--through voiceover or character dialogue--but that control is subject to innumerable constraints: the presence of other characters/performers and voices, the palpable and distracting "thereness" of decor and objects and so forth.
As Peter Brooks has noted, the description of things like fruit, furniture, and decorative objects--the stuff of still-life painting--is "sometimes maddeningly" typical of the novel, where it serves as a reality effect meant "to give a sense of the thereness of the physical world, as in a still-life painting" (16).