therianthropic


Also found in: Wikipedia.

therianthropic

(ˌθɪərɪənˈθrɒpɪk)
adj
1. (Classical Myth & Legend) (of certain mythical creatures or deities) having a partly animal, partly human form
2. (Classical Myth & Legend) of or relating to such creatures or deities
[C19: from Greek thērion wild animal + anthrōpos man]
therianthropism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
We should now speak up about these kinds of matter taking places within our country and start some campaigns for girls how to secure yourself and how to be strong enough to protect your own body from Therianthropic.
It ends with the "Sheep-human" mother's therianthropic response: a refusal to return to human "normality" or to "sell" her offspring (32-34).
Animal babies separate sex from the yokes of heteronormative human reproduction: most of the babies are the result of love affairs with gender ambiguous, therianthropic beings, adoption, experiment (scientific or shamanistic) or artificial insemination.
Yet, I cannot pretend to know what "becoming animal" looks like, although I am pretty sure that the therianthropic representations of half human and half animal are not it, or are at best a simplification.
Dyson (2008: 34), an author of Benuaq origin and Professor of Anthropology, opens another avenue toward an understanding of the timang in a very short comment: "The tiger in Benuaq culture is a were-animal (binatang jadi-jadian), who does not have a definite shape, but can kill humans immediately." (17) Here Dyson seems to refer to ailuranthropy, a typical form of therianthropy in Borneo, that is, the transformation of selected humans into a feline therianthropic being, in this case were-tigers, or -leopards.
He is a therianthropic beserker: a man who transforms his nature from human to animal in order to fight.
Other motifs include half-human, half-animal (therianthropic) forms that fit within a range of related beliefs about shamanic visions, rain animals and ritual initiatives to bring rain, which are central to historical/Xam shamanism.
As the intention of the artist cannot be assumed, we do not know whether these depictions meant to signal the male gender (their potency) or therianthropic character--e.g.
Begouen's interpretation of a therianthropic image at les Trois-Freres leaves little doubt as to who he thought was responsible for these magical acts of representation: