thermoelectric effect


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thermoelectric effect

n
(General Physics) another name for the Seebeck effect, Peltier effect
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Now there is an inexpensive and environmentally friendly way of producing them with the simplest of components: a normal pencil, photocopy paper, and conductive paint are sufficient to convert a temperature difference into electricity via the thermoelectric effect.
The so-called thermoelectric effect involves the generation of electricity from a temperature differential.
The thermoelectric effect occurs when one end of the material is hot and the other end is cold.
Furthermore, the combination of the thermoelectric effect termed the "Anomalous Nernst Effect,"(4) appearing due to the ferromagnetic properties added to the cobalt alloys and the spin Seebeck effect, have improved the thermoelectric conversion efficiency by more than 10 times.
Her research at iEnergy Centre at the Masdar Institute is about converting concentrated solar energy directly into electricity, using a solid-state heat engine to bring about the thermoelectric effect.
Among her many accomplishments, Dresselhaus was the first scientist to exploit the thermoelectric effect at the nanoscale, which could allow for devices that harvest energy from temperature differences in materials that conduct electricity.
The 15-yr old Canadian has invented a 'Hollow Flashlight' that works via the thermoelectric effect. The thermoelectric effect is where a change in temperature can lead to electric voltage and vice-versa.
The thermoelectric effect was first discovered by Thomas Seebeckin 1821 [1] when he discovered that twisting two wires together andtwistingone endinduced avoltage.
It generates electrical energy from the useless heat by thermoelectric effect. Thermoelectric materials can directly convert heat into electricity and vice versa.
This interaction results in a thermoelectric effect that was first observed during the 1950's and has come to be known as phonon-drag, because it can be quantified from the flow of lattice-wave quanta (phonons) that occurs over the temperature gradient.
Shortly thereafter, Schneider pondered the idea and with a technical approach utilizing photovoltaic cells and a Peltier junction (thermoelectric effect), the designer realized this idea to be a reality.

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