thermoluminescence

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Related to thermoluminescent: thermoluminescence dosimetry

ther·mo·lu·mi·nes·cence

 (thûr′mō-lo͞o′mə-nĕs′əns)
n.
A phenomenon in which certain minerals release previously absorbed radiation upon being moderately heated.

ther′mo·lu′mi·nes′cent adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thermoluminescence

(ˌθɜːməʊˌluːmɪˈnɛsəns)
n
(Chemistry) phosphorescence of certain materials or objects as a result of heating. It is caused by pre-irradiation of the material inducing defects which are removed by the heat, the energy released appearing as light: used in archaeological dating
ˌthermoˌlumiˈnescent adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ther•mo•lu•mi•nes•cence

(ˌθɜr moʊˌlu məˈnɛs əns)

n.
phosphorescence produced by the heating of a substance.
[1895–1900]
ther`mo•lu`mi•nes′cent, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

thermoluminescence

Atomic Physics. any luminescence appearing in materials upon application of heat, caused by electron movement which increases as the temperature rises. — thermoluminescent, adj.
See also: Heat
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Borossay Investigation of impurities in thermoluminescent Al2O3 materials by prompt-gamma activation analysis, J.
Formally, the difference in the height of the main peak (or surface area) thermoluminescent curves for detectors with isotopes [sup.6]Li and [sup.7]Li, placed in the same measuring point, resulting from the differences in cross sections for [sup.7]Li and [sup.6]Li on the thermal neutron absorption, allows for the calculation of the contribution of thermal neutrons to the total TLD signal in that measurement point.
In this study, we aimed to use the treatment planning system (TPS) calculation, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurement, and Monte Carlo (MC) simulation to evaluate the characteristics of dosimetric distribution of the novel radioactive stents of different lengths — with different number as well as activities of [sup]125 I seeds –– and to provide a theoretical basis for dosimetry for the clinical application.
Salvi, "Preparation and dosimetric properties of a highly sensitive CaS[O.sub.4]: Dy thermoluminescent dosimeter," Health Physics, vol.
Key words: radiation therapy, thermoluminescent dosimetry chip, avian, military macaw, Ara militaris
The physical method was based on film badge individual monitoring and irradiation of a simulator of a left hand containing thermoluminescent dosimeters.
In addition, they may use the principles of time, distance, and shielding as well as various monitoring devices such as Geiger Muller (GM) counter and Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLDs).
After an introduction, they cover thermoluminescence and its applications, recent advances and opportunities in thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) materials, luminescence dating: the basic approach to geochronology, the elastico-mechanoluminescence of thermoluminescent crystals, thermoluminescent phosphors for radiation dosimetry, using the optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) of electronic components in portable devices for retrospective accident dosimetry, and optical and morphological studies of doped core shell ZnS:Cu/ZnS nanoparticles.
Nambi, "On the sulphoxy radicals in CaS[O.sub.4]:Dy,Na thermoluminescent phosphor: electron paramagnetic resonance studies," Journal of Physics, vol.
Six thermoluminescent Luxel and ten optical stimulated luminescence technology Nanodots dosimeters (Landauer, Inc., Glenwood, IL) were used at the patient phantom, area monitor, and positive and negative controls for the LDXI.
This sequence was generally supported by thermoluminescent (TL) dates of museum ceramics (Berenguer et al.