thermonuclear reaction


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thermonuclear reaction

n
(Nuclear Physics) a nuclear fusion reaction occurring at a very high temperature: responsible for the energy produced in the sun, nuclear weapons, and fusion reactors. See nuclear fusion, hydrogen bomb
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thermonuclear reaction - a nuclear fusion reaction taking place at very high temperatures (as in the sun)
carbon cycle - a thermonuclear reaction in the interior of stars
nuclear fusion, nuclear fusion reaction, fusion - a nuclear reaction in which nuclei combine to form more massive nuclei with the simultaneous release of energy
References in periodicals archive ?
* the water cooling system of the reactor, designed to remove excess heat from the massive walls of the blanket and the chamber diverter; according to expert estimates, at the time of the ignition of the thermonuclear reaction in the chamber (with peak power of 1.1 GW), the blanket wall will heat up to 240 [degrees]C and the tungsten wall of the divertor up to 2000 [degrees]C; this system will also be used for cooling the ICRH-type plasma radiofrequency heater, the cryogenic system, etc.
* Start of the first thermonuclear reactions (helium synthesis from hydrogen); balancing of the gravitational contraction in the star-forming center through heat expansion.
There are descriptions of how the detonation of TNT compresses plutonium into a critical mass, sparking a chain reaction, and ultimately a thermonuclear reaction.
The concept is based on the use of powerful magnetic forces and electrical currents to confine light atomic cores and heat them internally and externally until fusion occurs, leading to a thermonuclear reaction giving off energy.
The researchers use the example of thermonuclear reaction processes of fusion and fission to express their conceptualized model:
When the layer builds to a certain depth, the fuel undergoes a runaway thermonuclear reaction and explodes, creating intense X-ray spikes detected by RXTE and other spacecraft.
When a dwarf--fed by a companion star--gets too heavy, a runaway thermonuclear reaction ignites in its core, producing a fireball bright enough to outshine surrounding galaxies.
When the tiny, Earth-sized white dwarf exceeds about 1.4 times the mass of the sun, a runaway thermonuclear reaction ignites and the star violently combusts, producing a bright cosmic pockmark.