thermoreceptor


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ther·mo·re·cep·tor

 (thûr′mō-rĭ-sĕp′tər)
n.
A sensory receptor that responds to heat and cold.

thermoreceptor

(ˌθɜːməʊrɪˈsɛptə)
n
(Physiology) a sensory receptor that responds to stimulation by cold or heat

ther•mo•re•cep•tor

(ˌθɜr moʊ rɪˈsɛp tər)

n.
a receptor stimulated by changes in temperature.
[1945–50]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thermoreceptor - a sensory receptor that responds to heat and cold
sense organ, sensory receptor, receptor - an organ having nerve endings (in the skin or viscera or eye or ear or nose or mouth) that respond to stimulation
References in periodicals archive ?
Transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) was initially characterized as a thermoreceptor activated by temperatures [less than or equal to]17[degrees]C (10).
Inflammation causes sensitisation of polymodal and mechano-nociceptor nerve endings and an abnormal increase in cold thermoreceptor activity, altogether evoking dryness sensations and pain.
have demonstrated that sensitization of nociceptors and depression of cold thermoreceptor activity can occur in UV-induced keratitis in guinea pigs [3].
It involves a molecular thermoreceptor called transient receptor potential melastatin 8 ("TRPM8"), which "express markers of nociceptors as well as non-nociceptors and have axonal properties indicative of both A[delta]- and C- fibers." (194) A singular focus on simplified pain pathways can prevent recognizing the rich array of pain experiences and the similarities among these.
This TRPM8-antagonist-induced hypothermia is the first example of a change in the deep body temperature of an animal occurring as a result of the documented pharmacological blockade of temperature signals at the thermoreceptor level.
The infrared receptor of Melanophila acuminata De Geer (Coleoptera: Buprestidae): ultrastructural study of a unique insect thermoreceptor and its possible descent from a hair mechanoreceptor.
A similar discussion of transient responses of thermal sensations and thermoreceptor responses can be found in the literature (Gagge et al.
It is difficult to understand why a thermoreceptor would be moved 100 [micro]m posteriorly in M.
Embr Labs, a Somerville, Mass.-based startup, was showcasing what it calls "a thermostat for your body." The Embr Wave is an intelligent bracelet that uses scientifically developed waveforms to precisely stimulate a person's thermoreceptors. This, according to CEO and co-founder Sam Shames, leverages the body's natural systems to make the wearer feel cooler or warmer by 5[degrees] F in just a few minutes.