thermoregulate


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Related to thermoregulate: Thermal regulation

ther·mo·reg·u·late

 (thûr′mō-rĕg′yə-lāt′)
intr.v. ther·mo·reg·u·lat·ed, ther·mo·reg·u·lat·ing, ther·mo·reg·u·lates
1. To regulate body temperature.
2. To undergo thermoregulation.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thermoregulate

(ˌθɜːməʊˈrɛɡjʊˌleɪt)
vb (intr)
to maintain regular temperature, esp regular body temperature
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Although wetlands and pastures likely provide hiding cover, prevalence of these habitat types may increase in areas used by fawns after fawns are mobile and may not be as suitable during their 1st month of life if water inhibits a fawn's ability to thermoregulate and pastures are actively grazed.
The researchers observed their body's ability to thermoregulate through four completed sessions of two-hour each.
Kids have a "reduced ability to thermoregulate their body temperatures," compared to adults, he explained.
Having been specifically designed over a period of 18 months for workers in chilled environments, Active Chill jackets will thermoregulate, keeping the wearer warm and at a consistent temperature for optimum comfort.
The negative correlation of FI and RT with T ([degrees]C) and positive with SI (Table 5) indicates that the animals stopped consuming food and remained standing in as an attempt to thermoregulate themselves, drinking more water to help stop the evaporative losses (by sweating and gasping for breath) due to the stressful conditions of heat observed during this period.
Movements observed in these dense cover types during diurnal periods may be attributed to foraging opportunities and traveling regularly between bedding cover sites and wallows to better thermoregulate during the higher temperature (Graves, 1984; Singer et al, 1991).
Though the Water-rat is unable to thermoregulate efficiently at water temperatures below 20 (o) C (Fanning and Dawson 1980), the species occurs up to an altitude of at least 1500 m in Mount Buffalo National Park.
However, the effect of moisture in the air is an important measure of the thermal comfort of animals (including humans) who rely on the evaporation of water (sweating or panting) to thermoregulate. High relative humidity at high temperatures limits the rate at which evaporation can occur, leading to heat stress or, in extreme circumstances, fatal overheating.
Individuals may behaviorally thermoregulate by moving upstream, away from the HBWC Channel, during periods of incoming, cooler ocean water.
Also, although women tend to thermoregulate better during pregnancy, we still don't fully understand the impact of elevated core body temperature, which may occur with regularly performed vigorous-intensity exercise over the course of pregnancy."