thermosphere

(redirected from thermospheres)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

ther·mo·sphere

 (thûr′mə-sfîr′)
n.
The outermost layer of the atmosphere, between the mesosphere and interplanetary space, where air becomes extremely thin and temperatures increase steadily with altitude.

ther′mo·spher′ic (-sfîr′ĭk, -sfĕr′ĭk) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thermosphere

(ˈθɜːməˌsfɪə)
n
(Physical Geography) an atmospheric layer lying between the mesosphere and the exosphere, reaching an altitude of about 400 kilometres where the temperature is over 1000°C
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ther•mo•sphere

(ˈθɜr məˌsfɪər)

n.
the region of the upper atmosphere, above the mesosphere, in which temperature increases continuously with altitude.
[1950–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

ther·mo·sphere

(thûr′mə-sfîr′)
The outermost layer of the Earth's atmosphere, lying above the mesosphere and extending hundreds of miles into outer space. In the thermosphere, which includes the exosphere and most of the ionosphere, temperatures increase steadily with altitude.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thermosphere - the atmospheric layer between the mesosphere and the exosphere
layer - a relatively thin sheetlike expanse or region lying over or under another
atmosphere - the envelope of gases surrounding any celestial body
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.