thesis


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the·sis

 (thē′sĭs)
n. pl. the·ses (-sēz)
1. A proposition that is maintained by argument.
2. A dissertation advancing an original point of view as a result of research, especially as a requirement for an academic degree.
3. A hypothetical proposition, especially one put forth without proof.
4. The first stage of the Hegelian dialectic process.
5.
a. The long or accented part of a metrical foot, especially in quantitative verse.
b. The unaccented or short part of a metrical foot, especially in accentual verse.
6. Music The accented section of a measure.

[Latin, from Greek, from tithenai, to put; see dhē- in Indo-European roots. Senses 5 and 6, Middle English, from Late Latin, lowering of the voice, from Greek, downbeat.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

thesis

(ˈθiːsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
1. (Education) a dissertation resulting from original research, esp when submitted by a candidate for a degree or diploma
2. a doctrine maintained or promoted in argument
3. (Education) a subject for a discussion or essay
4. (Logic) an unproved statement, esp one put forward as a premise in an argument
5. (Classical Music) music the downbeat of a bar, as indicated in conducting
6. (Poetry) (in classical prosody) the syllable or part of a metrical foot not receiving the ictus. Compare arsis
7. (Philosophy) philosophy the first stage in the Hegelian dialectic, that is challenged by the antithesis
[C16: via Late Latin from Greek: a placing, from tithenai to place]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

the•sis

(ˈθi sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1. a proposition stated or put forward for consideration, esp. one to be discussed and proved or to be maintained against objections.
2. a subject for a composition or essay.
3. a formal paper incorporating original research on a subject, esp. one presented by a candidate for a degree.
4. a musical downbeat. Compare arsis (def. 1).
5.
a. a part of a metrical foot that does not bear the ictus or stress.
b. (less commonly) the part of a metrical foot that bears the ictus. Compare arsis (def. 2).
6. See under Hegelian dialectic.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin < Greek thésis the act of setting down, position, thesis =(ti)thé(nai) to put, set down + -sis -sis]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.thesis - an unproved statement put forward as a premise in an argumentthesis - an unproved statement put forward as a premise in an argument
assumption, premise, premiss - a statement that is assumed to be true and from which a conclusion can be drawn; "on the assumption that he has been injured we can infer that he will not to play"
2.thesis - a treatise advancing a new point of view resulting from research; usually a requirement for an advanced academic degree
treatise - a formal exposition
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

thesis

noun
1. proposition, theory, hypothesis, idea, view, opinion, proposal, contention, line of argument This thesis does not stand up to close inspection.
2. dissertation, paper, treatise, essay, composition, monograph, disquisition He was awarded his PhD for a thesis on industrial robots.
3. (Logic) premise, subject, statement, proposition, theme, topic, assumption, postulate, surmise, supposition His central thesis is that crime is up because children do not learn self-control.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

thesis

noun
1. A hypothetical controversial proposition:
2. A thorough, written presentation of an original point of view:
3. Something taken to be true without proof:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
أطْروحَه، مَبْحَث
disertační/doktorská prácestudie
afhandling
doktori értekezésPhD-értekezés
ritgerî, doktorsritgerî
disertācija
dizertačná/doktorská práca

thesis

[ˈθiːsɪs] N (theses (pl)) [ˈθiːsiːz]tesis f inv
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

thesis

[ˈθiːsɪs] [theses] [ˈθiːsiːz] (pl) n
(= theory) → thèse f
(UNIVERSITY) (= dissertation) → thèse f
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

thesis

n pl <theses>
(= argument)These f
(Univ, for PhD) → Dissertation f, → Doktorarbeit f (inf); (for diploma) → Diplomarbeit f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

thesis

[ˈθiːsɪs] n (theses (pl)) [ˈθiːsiːz]tesi f inv
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

thesis

(ˈθiːsis) plural ˈtheses (-siːz) noun
a long written essay, report etc, often done for a university degree. a doctoral thesis; He is writing a thesis on the works of John Milton.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

the·sis

n. tesis; postulado.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in classic literature ?
The question is this: Monsieur the Principal thinks that my thesis ought to be dogmatic and didactic."
Whether any one who has been subjected by the laws of his country to an unjust judgment is right in attempting to escape, is a thesis about which casuists might disagree.
Well assured that their speech is intelligible and the most natural thing in the world, they add thesis to thesis, without a moment's heed of the universal astonishment of the human race below, who do not comprehend their plainest argument; nor do they ever relent so much as to insert a popular or explaining sentence, nor testify the least displeasure or petulance at the dulness of their amazed auditory.
The method of inquiry has passed into a method of teaching in which by the help of interlocutors the same thesis is looked at from various points of view.
Tell me the thesis, so that I may apply your knowledge as you go on.
His Thesis on the French Revolution was noteworthy in college annals, not merely for its painstaking and voluminous accuracy, but for the fact that it was the dryest, deadest, most formal, and most orthodox screed ever written on the subject.
You had, as I have been led to believe, some comments to make upon the proposition which I advanced in my thesis."
His revenge came when she defended Maeterlinck and he brought into action the carefully-thought-out thesis of "The Shame of the Sun."
The idealization of the sufferer is carried still further in the Gorgias, in which the thesis is maintained, that 'to suffer is better than to do evil;' and the art of rhetoric is described as only useful for the purpose of self-accusation.
"My thesis is," he says, "that if we start with the supposition that there is only one primal stuff or material in the world, a stuff of which everything is composed, and if we call that stuff
The versification although carrying the fanciful to the very verge of the fantastic, is nevertheless admirably adapted to the wild insanity which is the thesis of the poem.
"I have considered the thesis," answered the little man, composedly.